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Summary:

UK retailer John Lewis is reporting that they expect women to buy more electronic goods than men this holiday season.  Helen Keppel Compton at the company told The Sunday Times that a “tippingpoint” had been reached this winter and women would be responsible forbetween 50% and […]

UK retailer John Lewis is reporting that they expect women to buy more electronic goods than men this holiday season. 

Helen Keppel Compton at the company told The Sunday Times that a “tippingpoint” had been reached this winter and women would be responsible forbetween 50% and 60% of all purchases in its electrical departments duringthe festive season.

She said most of the women were buying gadgets such as digital radios, iPodsand digital photo frames. “The appeal of technology to women iscross-generational, from young women who have grown up with technology, towomen who have been exposed to technology at work and older, motivatedself-learners who are all embracing new products which help them capturememories, stay organised and keep in touch,” she said.

This is cool but I wonder what research they are using to make this claim.  I wonder what the percentage of electronic gadgets are being snapped up by women in the US?

(via Sunday Times)

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  1. So are you trying to tell me to move to Brittan? Because that sounds like a justifiable reason if I have ever heard of one.

  2. I wonder if there is similar research that shows that more men than women are buying perfume, lingerie, and chocolates this christmas?

  3. John Lewis is a department store like Macy’s. I think this has a skewed demographic already – as I tend to go to a specialist store whenever I buy electronics (unless Microcenter start selling socks…)

  4. John in Norway Monday, December 17, 2007

    British women have been buying ‘electronic gadgets’ since before Ann Summers became popular. :)

  5. Paul Cooper (see above) has got the right analysis. In my experience, in the more techie stores in the UK, women feel, or are made to feel, uncomfortable. The staff are often condescending or unhelpful. John Lewis is the sort of store where women are more likely to feel comfortable. By the same token, I suspect a lot of techie men would not buy gadgets in John Lewis. You have to walk past domestic furnishings, clothes, crockery and so on to get to the gadgets!

  6. Sorry, I meant to say in my message above that PJE had the correct analysis, not Paul Cooper. Apologies to both. It’s confusing having the poster’s name below the message rather than above it.

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