Summary:

The UN Convention on Climate Change has moved into overtime as delegates furiously work to mete out a resolution, with Yvo de Boer, the convention’s executive secretary, saying they are “on the brink of agreement,” though declining to offer any specifics, NYTimes reports. “It’s not actually […]

The UN Convention on Climate Change has moved into overtime as delegates furiously work to mete out a resolution, with Yvo de Boer, the convention’s executive secretary, saying they are “on the brink of agreement,” though declining to offer any specifics, NYTimes reports. “It’s not actually all that much that is outstanding,” de Boer added in a show of forced optimism. “People are working very hard to resolve outstanding issues.”

The conference’s biggest sticking point has been the inclusion of hard numbers and dates for emissions reductions, something the U.S. and the EU have been wrangling over for years. The U.S., along with several other countries, refuses to cooperate without the inclusion of India and China. But as Nobel winner Rajendra Pachauri told CNN, the only way to realistically tackle global climate change to set definite emissions reduction targets in the form of hard numbers and specific dates.

Discussions are expected to go into the wee hours of Saturday morning. Hopefully what will emerge is a framework for discussions over the next two years to help decide how the global community will address climate change in a post-Kyoto world.

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