7 Comments

Summary:

There’s certainly no shortage of online office applications these days. You can find anything from general-purpose office suites (such as Google Docs or Zoho‘s ever-growing suite) to dedicated CRM solutions at a variety of price points. If you’re running a small or medium business, LongJump wants […]

LongJump logoThere’s certainly no shortage of online office applications these days. You can find anything from general-purpose office suites (such as Google Docs or Zoho‘s ever-growing suite) to dedicated CRM solutions at a variety of price points. If you’re running a small or medium business, LongJump wants you to take a look at their offering, now available as a free trial but with subscription pricing announced starting in January.

LongJump brings four major selling points to the table. The first is a fairly extensive set of prebuilt business applications: sales force automation, lead tracking, email campaign management, IT asset tracking, deal tracking, support case management, and more. These all interconnect, so you can avoid duplicate data entry.

The second big feature is pricing that’s designed to undercut some of the high-end players in the hosted business application market: $19.95 per user per month. While you can find, for example, open source CRM applications for less, you’re unlikely to match the full set of functionality here at that price.

Third, you get the ability to build and customize your own applications. Their in-browser application development environment actually works fairly intuitively, if you’ve got any experience with database-backed applications, and lets you quickly build and tweak your own entry screens and reports.

Finally, you can take those purpose-built applications of your own and publish them back into the LongJump catalog. They haven’t announced the details yet, but when subscriptions go live in January there will be some form of revenue-sharing for application developers. So potentially there’s a hook here for web workers to make a few dollars while also getting their own work done.

Will LongJump take off? It’s hard to say at this point. They’ve got a reasonable set of starter applications, and their customization story is good. But the markets for both online offices and application builders are pretty crowded these days. I’m still waiting to see whether any one player can pull away from the pack to become a runaway success.

Related research

Subscriber Content

Subscriber content comes from Gigaom Research, bridging the gap between breaking news and long-tail research. Visit any of our reports to learn more and subscribe.

By Mike Gunderloy

You're subscribed! If you like, you can update your settings

Related stories

  1. Long Jump’s UI feels more professional than Zoho and Google Docs. As a professional sharing my content on the Web, I could see myself feeling a little more secure signing up for this site. I had the same experience when I was deciding which online data backup provider to use. I ultimately chose Mozy because its site looked and felt as secure as its actual functionality.

    Share
  2. [...] Mike Gunderloy, over on Web Worker Daily, writes a lot more about Long Jump and says that it wants to be your online [...]

    Share
  3. [...] 8th, 2008 (11:00am) Mike Gunderloy No Comments Online application vendor LongJump (who we covered back in November) has announced a major new initiative that they’re calling “Database [...]

    Share
  4. Mozy has a very professional look and it has an established powerhouse of venture capitalists behind the site.

    Share
  5. I personally use http://www.edeskonline.com. I found it pretty useful for small business CRM.It has some unique features in addition of online office and collaboration suite.

    Share
  6. If you like the IT asset management functionality. Look at
    http://property.strongtech.com
    Here you can manage any type of property, customize all your headers, and its integrated with seven different Google APS

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post