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Summary:

The Weather Channel is expanding its online video offerings this week with Football Forecast, according to MediaWeek. Hosted by journalist Tim Liatta, the web-only series will look at the weather being forecast for upcoming NFL games and examine how each team typically performs under the expected […]

The Weather Channel is expanding its online video offerings this week with Football Forecast, according to MediaWeek. Hosted by journalist Tim Liatta, the web-only series will look at the weather being forecast for upcoming NFL games and examine how each team typically performs under the expected conditions.

According to a Weather Channel spokesperson, this is not an official deal with the NFL, just something the site is doing on its own. Depending on how well the show does, weather.com could branch out into other sports, but given the turbulence of fall weather, the fact that most games are outdoors and the rabid fan base of the NFL, football is the site’s best bet.

The show will be available on Thursdays (Monday is too far out from the game to accurately predict the weather).

This isn’t the first foray into sports video from The Weather Channel — it also runs an NFL video blog, covering topics like tailgating and cheerleading.

  1. I just don’t see myself going to the Weather Channel to see this type of information. Julian, if she is still there, hell if thats her name… anyway the woman on FOX was better at quickly pointing out this type of information.

    I’m sure there are more useful ways to explore weather around sports that real fans could appreciate. Tailgators forecast, friday night lights rain outs… something.

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  2. Chris Albrecht Monday, November 12, 2007

    You’re right Lawrence, but I think it’s kinda cool that the otherwise staid Weather Channel is embracing video and trying to do more than show maps of high pressure systems moving through the midwest.

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  3. I agree with Lawrence. While I give kudos to The Weather Channel for the ambition, this won’t be an easy touchdown. Without brilliant marketing (unlikely), the typical football fan won’t flock to watch videos at weather.com.

    Perhaps a partnership would make sense here. For example, I can see the show working on ESPN.com.

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