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Summary:

The Google-led Open Handset Alliance has released the Android Software Development Kit (SDK). The Android SDK needs an x86-based computer running Windows XP or Vista; Mac OS 10.4.8 or later; or Linux Ubuntu Dapper Drake or later (other modern distributions of Linux will also likely work […]

The Google-led Open Handset Alliance has released the Android Software Development Kit (SDK). The Android SDK needs an x86-based computer running Windows XP or Vista; Mac OS 10.4.8 or later; or Linux Ubuntu Dapper Drake or later (other modern distributions of Linux will also likely work but are not directly supported). Download it here. (More details are here.)

In addition, Google also announced the Android Developer Challenge, which will provide $10 million to developers who build mobile applications for Android. This includes cash prizes ranging from $25,000 to $275,000 to developers whose applications are picked by a panel of judges. (Given my skepticism, no chance I am going to be on that panel ;-)

* The $10 million will be divided between the Android Developer Challenge I and II.
* Submissions for Challenge I will be accepted from Jan. 2 through March 3, 2008.
* 50 most promising entries will be picked by end of March 2008 with each receiving $25,000 awards for further development.
* These 50 entries can also compete for 10 awards worth $275,000 each and another 10 worth $100,000 each.
* Challenge II will launch after the first handsets built on the platform become available in the second half of 2008.

Do you plan to start building apps for Android? If you are a developer and would like to share your opinions/thoughts, please drop us a line or send us a link to your blog.

  1. free market research company Monday, November 12, 2007

    Great initiative – I think VC could take a lesson from it — i.e. lets identify the problem and challenge entrepreneurs to come up with solution – and cut down round of negotiations of understanding whole business model – which could save loads of disappointed souls.

  2. I’m going to be all over this, and I think you’ll find independent developers from all over the world will be to. There’s never been a development environment for phones that provides this much functionality (full access to the phone) at zero cost. No development license, no distribution license, no handset purchase.

    This $10m challenge is smart too. By splitting it in two, they’ll build up the hype in March and still encourage more development for release with the handset.

  3. This entire thing seems like a solution looking for a problem rather than the other way around.

  4. @Nick: Have you used a mobile phone lately? Let alone tried to write an application for one? If so the problem should be pretty apparent.

    The idea of being able to write a mobile phone app that can take advantage of things like GPS and SMS and isn’t walled in to a Java Middlet is pretty appealing from a development perspective. Thinking of what developers will make with this is very appealing from a phone user’s perspective.

  5. herman manfred Monday, November 12, 2007

    Poor Palm.

    Poor Access.

  6. herman

    truer words have never been spoken.

  7. Google Unveils ‘Early Look’ Mobile (Android) SDK

    Just a week or so following its first official acknowledgement of plans to deliver (through the newly founded Open Handset Alliance) its much-hyped mobile platform, Google today released its Android software developer kit (SDK). The company is inviting…

  8. Interesting. Seems like a great boon for Google (propellerhead) fanatics. Hopefully the legions of open source wizards that’ll be flocking to this will let the $10M bribe inspire them to create a truly warm, more engaging experience, and an accompanying marketing outreach program that’s geared towards the larger marketplace. Maybe even innovate. That’d be cool. Otherwise, it’s just another phone.

  9. This will definitely turn the mobile market on its head.

    A new Google group has been created for developers. http://groups.google.com/group/android-sdk

  10. solution looking for a problem ?

    Maybe I’m missing something but I agree with Reto that this open approach (not necessarily the money) is going to shake things up quickly and in a big and positive way.

    I’m already anxious to get rid of my nasty Palm Treo software (and maybe the whole phone) given that it won’t even synch anymore without me losing all my data. I envision a mobile future where my phone, PC, GIS, picture, and online needs all merge seamlessly, are accessible from all my devices easily and without any extra steps, and where I pay nothing for services in exchange for viewing ads or pay something if I want to get rid of the ads.

    Open Handset is going to make that happen fast, and I wish them well.

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