Summary:

All the radio fuss these days is over satellite and HD, but this FM radio developed by physicists at Berkeley caught my ear eye today. The FM receiver is so small, you wouldn’t see it without the aid of a microscope because 10,000 of them would […]

NanoradiotimelinesizesAll the radio fuss these days is over satellite and HD, but this FM radio developed by physicists at Berkeley caught my ear eye today. The FM receiver is so small, you wouldn’t see it without the aid of a microscope because 10,000 of them would be the same width as a human hair. A single carbon nanotube comprises the antenna, amp, tuner and demodulator, which can be used either as an FM receiver or FM transmitter. There’s not much info on the radio range at this point, but if you check the project site, you can hear the song “Layla” recorded as a WAV file from the nanotube radio. There’s a bunch of static, but how amazing is it that you can hear the song from something so small? Nanotechnology is definitely worth watching as it develops. Can you imagine how the technology could be extended to mobile devices?Image: Courtesy Zettl Research Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California at Berkeley(via GigaOm)

Comments have been disabled for this post