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Summary:

Billing itself as “MTV meets QVC,” Honeyshed made its debut in a soft launch last week. The idea behind the site is to create branded entertainment so transparent about the fact that it’s selling something that as a viewer, you don’t even care. As of now, […]

Billing itself as “MTV meets QVC,” Honeyshed made its debut in a soft launch last week. The idea behind the site is to create branded entertainment so transparent about the fact that it’s selling something that as a viewer, you don’t even care. As of now, however, all Honeyshed manages to be is as shallow as MTV — without QVC’s tacky fun.
honeyshed.jpg

The site is basically a series of infomercials in which a group of attractive young adults espouse the virtues of different products. They wax enthusiastic about everything from lip balm to comfy slippers, all without even a hint of irony.

Admittedly, the site is beta and so will change over the coming months; it plans to add stuff like sketch comedy, live segments and episodic content centered around brands. But slapping a beta tag on your logo doesn’t excuse deficiencies as glaring as those of Honeyshed.

Technically, the site works fine. Video is crisp. Audio is good. And when trying to buy a pair of 25th anniversary edition Reeboks, the path from Honeyshed to the Reebok store worked flawlessly.

One big technical aggravation is that the content starts as soon as you hit the page, dropping you into the middle of a vapid discussion about something like how everyone on the red carpet is wearing false eyelashes these days. And there’s no pause button to let you stop and get your bearings.

The bigger problem is that while the talking heads may be younger than their QVC counterparts, it’s essentially no different: people sitting around talking about products. Perfect products. Perfect products that have no drawbacks or weaknesses whatsoever, if you believe the hosts. And again, without the tacky fun.

In a jaded web 2.0 world, where everyone is a published critic and information is a mouse click away, to pretend that imperfections in products don’t exist makes these types of infomercials seem isolated from reality, anachronistic. No one sits around having these types of discussions. If you want to make the brand the center of the show, make the show something more than just a laundry list of why the product is so good.

For a company trying to reinvent the notion of entertainment and marketing, they are merely taking an antiquated method and slapping a fresh coat of lip balm on it.

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  1. [...] isn’t the first to put brands center stage. Honeyshed created a series of tarted-up infomercials for brands like Reebok. The big difference is that Firebrand isn’t trying to create original [...]

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  2. [...] 由於廣告影片常常時間短又有趣,觀賞起來也是另外一番樂趣。這個網站的收入來源是向刊登廣告的業者收費。Fireband本身則是由 NBC Universal、Microsoft、以及GE’s Peacock Equity Fund所贊助 (privately funded)。除了線上收看廣告,Fireband也在傳統電視頻道 ION Network上面,固定週一到週五晚上11點到深夜的時段,播放他們要刊登的廣告。類似的網站有 HoneyShed ,提供相關產品的使用經驗談的廣告影片。Firebrand之後還會加上購物車的連結,方便使用者在觀賞廣告後直接購物。下面是Firebrand網站的畫面。 [...]

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  3. [...] watch an ad, head over there before the final plug is pulled. Can the infomercials-as-content site Honeyshed’s demise be far [...]

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  4. [...] “Can the infomercials-as-content site Honeyshed’s demise be far [...]

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  5. [...] promising to blend the merchandise-moving capabilities of QVC with the video stylings of MTV. We weren’t fans of it then (to put it mildly), but with the site officially out of beta as of last week and a [...]

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  6. [...] Shuts Down Hate to say we told you so (two times), but Honeyshed, the QVC-meets-MTV online video shopping channel, is shutting down, reports [...]

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