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Summary:

Think that the DRM-free music store that Amazon recently launched went unnoticed by *cough* Apple *cough*, I mean competing online music retailers? Word out of Infinite Loop, the blog not the place, is that iTunes Plus is about to drop the DRM-free, single track price from […]

DollarstoreThink that the DRM-free music store that Amazon recently launched went unnoticed by *cough* Apple *cough*, I mean competing online music retailers? Word out of Infinite Loop, the blog not the place, is that iTunes Plus is about to drop the DRM-free, single track price from $1.29 to $.99, which is the same price as the DRM protected tracks. Come to think of it: why is it called iTunes Plus when it technically doesn’t add anything but really subtracts the DRM? I guess iTunes Minus didn’t cut the mustard with the marketing folks… anyway: DRM and DRM-free tracks at the same price is all good to me. No truth to the rumors that Dollar Stores everywhere will carry digital downloads, but hey, that’s a million dollar marketing idea, no?

  1. iTunes Plus means you can play the tracks outside of iTunes, like say on a Zune. Although I suspect that with all the trouble Microsoft had playing WMA’s without skipping problems it wouldn’t surprise me if the 256Kbps AAC tracks might have some playback issues…

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  2. Scotty, I was just kidding about the name… ;)

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  3. I thought the reason they called it iTunes Plus was because you buy a higher audio quality sound file. That is, in theory, the extra cost is supposed to be for the better quality sound file. In practice, though, it does feel like you’re paying extra to avoid DRM (even if you do get a better sound file).

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