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Summary:

Michael Dell is no doubt a busy guy, being CEO of Dell and all.  A recent interview he gave Reuters shows how he needs to put jkOnTheRun in his feeds to make a better use of his busy work schedule. "The transition to notebooks, mobility has […]

DellmobilegrowthMichael Dell is no doubt a busy guy, being CEO of Dell and all.  A recent interview he gave Reuters shows how he needs to put jkOnTheRun in his feeds to make a better use of his busy work schedule.

"The transition to notebooks, mobility has been faster than even the esteemedanalysts at Gartner predicted," Dell said at a conference organized bytechnology research firm Gartner.
 
"I think it’s going to continue," Dell said. "The other X factor in this –emerging markets have been going to mobile at a faster rate than anyoneanticipated, and you have also this global boom in the economy, particularly outof the U.S., fueled by small business and consumers who are gobbling upnotebooks, so a big priority for us and a big change in how the market isshaped," he said.

Mr. Dell, haven’t you been paying attention to what we’ve been saying for almost four years?  Mobile technology is here to stay, and it’s getting bigger all the time.  Get that Dell Tablet PC released and while you’re at it jump into the UMPC fray.  It’s the future of computing as you’re just now figuring out.  Stick with us, we’ll guide you through it.

(via I4U)

  1. GoodThings2Life Thursday, October 11, 2007

    JK,

    I have good news from my Dell sales rep at work… he’s informed my boss and I that the Dell Tablet PC is due for release “in early November.” Apparently, GBM has reported that a poster on their forums is claiming the first week of November, so that does seem to match what my sales rep is telling me.

    That said, I have one of the units being shipped to me upon its release to use as a demo model, so I’ll keep you and GBM posted on it.

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  2. You are a funny guy : )

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  3. You’re making a lot of assumptions about the market as a whole. I’ve seen things from a completely different perspective, here.

    1) Dell makes a lot of money from corporations. As a result, they produce what corporate users want the most.
    2) End-users want it all. While an exec might want a small laptop, the Dell D420 is about as small as they’ll accept. The Fujitsu P1610 is way too small for them. Salespeople will accept a 15″ laptop just to get an internal CD-ROM drive, even in this day and age. They live off of their laptops, and if it can’t do everything, then it might as well not do anything.
    3) Users want two devices, tops. One is a computer, and one is a communications device. The former is a laptop, and the latter is a Blackberry, since that pulls triple duty as a phone, a PDA, and an email device. (I’m sure if we wanted to, we could move users to a WinMo setup, or Palm, or Symbian, we’re not too picky.)
    4) Users want power. Since they’re not willing to deal with data sync issues between a desktop, a laptop, a UMPC, and a phone, the one device that they DO carry had better be able to outpace them at all times. That means gobs of RAM, decent I/O, and oftentimes, a dualcore CPU.

    Mobile tech is certainly here to stay, but it’s not moving into the corporate workspace as fast as we’ve led ourselves to believe. The ultramobile tech nomads are still less than a minority, they’re a complete corner case. People still look at me funny when I use a TabletPC in slate mode, or walk around the office with a Sony UX, fixing a server. They don’t get how I can stand to run a remote desktop connection from the palm of my hand, and they question why I bother with such a tiny PC when I end up docking it to a full LCD/keyboard/mouse at my desk.

    I’m sure that we could get a handful of sales reps to carry a UX, or an OQO, or a UMPC as a field device, but they’re not really asking for it, and until you get the average corporate user to care about ultramobile tech, it’s just not in Dell’s interest to jump into such a shallow pool.

    Mind you, once it does take off, Dell will kick themselves, release a halfway decent first-gen product, and have something truly ready for the mobile workplace by the second generation.

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  4. Chris, I am not making any assumptions here, this is just a tongue-in-cheek response to the statements that Michael Dell really made. I agree with you that mobile devices are not mainstream but they are growing in usage as witness to Dell’s statements.

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