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Summary:

When it comes to energy policy in the U.S., the states are increasingly calling the shots — and they know it. This week, the Governors Association officially launched a task force to advance clean energy development at the state level, and it’s being given $610,000 from […]

When it comes to energy policy in the U.S., the states are increasingly calling the shots — and they know it. This week, the Governors Association officially launched a task force to advance clean energy development at the state level, and it’s being given $610,000 from the DOE to get started.

Separately, a federal judge on Wednesday said that states are allowed to regulate the amount of greenhouse gas emissions emitted from vehicles.

Here’s a brief look at some other policy news from the states. What’s happening in your neck of the woods?

New Jersey has adopted a new system to promote solar energy that aims have at least 2 percent of the electricity consumed in the state come from solar panels by 2020. The state will switch from an up-front rebate system to a commodity-style market based on Solar Renewable Energy Credits, which uses private financing to pay for solar installations. But not everybody is happy, since, as an op-ed in the Star Ledger notes, the program “could cost electric ratepayers an extra $6 billion over the next three decades.”

A bill in California that would launch the nation’s largest solar water heating program advanced to the Governor’s desk this week.

In Maryland, the Board of Public Works approved a policy to increase the state’s use of ethanol- and biodiesel-powered cars and trucks and to triple the number of hybrids in its fleet by 2011 – The Baltimore Sun

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  1. Ooooh! $610,000 from the DOE! For all 50 States’ Governors!
    That’s $12,200 per STATE! Great to see how much the Federal Gov’t is concerned about our energy future.

    I’m sorry. Don’t step in the puddles from my dripping sarcasm.

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