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Purdue University is the latest higher education facility to use text messages for campus emergencies. The  current semester will be used to test their system and the plan is to provide an Early Warning Notification System for students, faculty and staff. With a few very unfortunate […]

PurduePurdue University is the latest higher education facility to use text messages for campus emergencies. The  current semester will be used to test their system and the plan is to provide an Early Warning Notification System for students, faculty and staff. With a few very unfortunate and tragic security incidents in recent years, I’m seeing more organizations look for mobile tech to assist with security situations. The near-instant nature of text messaging makes it a perfect conduit to provide security information, warnings and updates and it’s highly likely that most students have a cell phone that can receive these. Students: don’t hem and haw over having to provide your cell phone to school administration if you opt-in. They have your best interests in mind with this approach as long as they use the info only for the purposes intended.

  1. My school is doing exactly the same thing. I go to a small liberal arts school in St. Louis. Very few students live on campus. Last year we had the first snow day since 1978 and the power went down twice. To me, it makes a lot of sense. If the power is out in the area, you can’t check the website or the TV, but cell phones still work.

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  2. My university, Indiana Tech, has been offering a SMS / TXT MSG warning system since last year… IndianaTech.edu/Textcaster
    Personally, all the messages for just a “Thunderstorm Watch” are irritating, but receiving a “Tornado Warning”, “Cancellation”, or heaven forbid, “Emergency”, is good to know.

    Also, after the Virgina Tech shooting, they installed those emergency intercom + blue light posts all over campus.

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  3. Johns Hopkins also turned on their system this past week. It’s opt-in, and they say that weather-related messages won’t be sent — only true emergencies.

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