8 Comments

Summary:

Prius-owner ‘Dave’ recently had his car converted to a plug-in and is documenting his mileage and gas usage (pointed out by Calcars). He drives over 60 miles a day, and just drove 1,307 miles on his last tank of gas. Whoa! And he only needs 9.578 […]

Prius-owner ‘Dave’ recently had his car converted to a plug-in and is documenting his mileage and gas usage (pointed out by Calcars). He drives over 60 miles a day, and just drove 1,307 miles on his last tank of gas. Whoa! And he only needs 9.578 gallons to fill his tank — that equals 136.45mpg notes Calcars. Sorry Liz, efficient driving can’t compete with a plug in your wall.

Last week Toyota confirmed that it has developed a plug-in hybrid car, which it will test on roads in Japan. Other car manufacturers, GM and Ford, are considering plug-in hybrids options too. There are several companies that offer conversions of hybrids into plug-ins, and Dave’s conversion was done via Hybrids-Plus in Boulder, Colorado.

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  1. Imagine if they made a car like this affordable and available for the rest of us? Something like a $14,000 or $15,000 plug-in hybrid? Imagine what a difference it would make is we were all getting 1300 miles per gallon. I bet it would even help “the economy” as we could spend our money on other things.

  2. Wow, I just saw on their site that the conversion costs as much as 32,500. I love the planet and all, but that is quite an investment.

  3. Jesse Kopelman Wednesday, August 1, 2007

    The real question is how many miles do you get per kWhr? Electricity isn’t free, so does plugging in actually save you money? Also, most electricity generation still relies on dirty fossil fuel powered plants so I’m not sure that plugging in does anything to help the environment either.

  4. A rough estimate is that PHEVs use about 200-250 watt-hours (or .2 to .250 kWhrs) per mile of driving. These are numbers for the Prius. So if you assume 40 miles per “gallon-equivalent”, that would be about 40x.250 or 10 kWhr, or about $1.00 to $1.50 in electricity costs. So compared with gasoline, the electricity is quite reasonable, but the cost of batteries is a serious issue.

    It is also true that alot of electricity is produced from dirty sources, like coal. But there are reasonable prospects for producing electricity from clean sources like wind and solar. Even at the elevated prices of these “green” sources, the electricity cost is still quite favorable to gasoline, which has no other econmically viable green substitute.

  5. Unless he is stealing electricity from his neighbor, it still costs money to plug in. Instead of seeing his MPG, lets see his miles per dollar fuel spent.

  6. Burnin’ All Illusions » The Prius Goes On Forever Thursday, August 2, 2007

    [...] Earth2Tech is reporting on a modified Prius that gets over 1300 miles per tank of gas, or 136.45 mpg. [...]

  7. 136 Miles Per Gallon — Nerd Zapper Friday, August 3, 2007

    [...] to be able to be plugged in (to a standard electrical outlet). According to the article, the man is now getting 136.45 miles/gallon, or 1,307 miles on a single tank of gas, much better than the very good 60 miles/gallon the Prius [...]

  8. Jesse Kopelman Saturday, August 4, 2007

    Jim, just so you know, many people pay > $0.20/kWhr. So you might want to amend your estimate to $1 – $2+. Still generally less than gasoline and diesel, though.

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