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Summary:

[qi:_newteevee] Next New Networks, ON Networks, Revision3, 60 Frames, Vuguru, Telegraph Ave Productions, WatchMojo — what do these companies have in common? They all use Moore’s Law and low-cost distribution over the Internet to disrupt the studio model, in the process building audiences that can rival […]

[qi:_newteevee] Next New Networks, ON Networks, Revision3, 60 Frames, Vuguru, Telegraph Ave Productions, WatchMojo — what do these companies have in common? They all use Moore’s Law and low-cost distribution over the Internet to disrupt the studio model, in the process building audiences that can rival a small cable channel. They are professionalizing internet TV. More details here.

[qi:028] I like to call it Professionally Produced Internet Video (PPIV), an acronym that can be easily used when you want to dis-a-show. I do agree – these pro-produced shows that should include the likes of Cranky Geeks, where fellow old curmudgeon John Dvorak snarls, are seeing their audiences grow by the month.

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  2. It’s great to see these shows grow – but I think they still have a long way to go in finding an own style of story telling.

    Cranky Geeks is a great example. I think John is doing a great job, and I try to catch every episode – but I don’t watch the shows. Instead, I listen to them on my iPod. I just get really bored of watching people sitting around a table and talk …

    The same is true for many of the more popluar tech video podcasts. Seriously, is there anything visually more boring than watching your average start-up founder talk about himself for half an hour?

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  3. Jesse Kopelman Friday, July 20, 2007

    To expand on Janko’s point — why does everything have to be a video?! One thing I hate about Comcast’s homepage is that they are always trying to trick me into launching a “video headline” in their cumbersome Fan player. Am I the only one left who would rather actually read something than watch people read it to me? Also, some claim a picture is worth a thousand words and a video ten thousand, but there are times where a single paragraph conveys a lot more useful information than a 30-second video. How about the idea of using the right tool for the job. If something is more impactful visually fine, but otherwise save the bandwidth and just give me the print/audio edition.

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  4. Interesting take…And its also reflected in the shift of buzz from MySpace to facebook…

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  5. The issue for these guys will be to attract consumer funding – a lot of this is open to competition by free / subsidised video.

    (We blogged a very similar set of thoughts today about the future of Podcasting, over on Broadstuff)

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