Summary:

Research company Interpret has conducted a survey of 200 iPhone users and 800 non-iPhone mobile phone users and found that iPhone users have…

Research company Interpret has conducted a survey of 200 iPhone users and 800 non-iPhone mobile phone users and found that iPhone users have a higher interest in watching video, and the device may have a halo effect reports C21 Media. The survey found that 63 percent of iPhone owners have already used the device to watch video: 51 percent have watched a YouTube video, 46 percent have watched a music video, 34 percent have watched news and 32 percent have watched a movie trailer. Mind you, it’s hardly surprising that so many people have had a look at a video after buying the much-hyped iPhone — the real test will be how many videos each are watching in six months. Of the non-iPhone users 28 percent report having watched video on their mobile phone (which is a reasonable figure), and those handsets have been around a lot longer…although non-iPhone owners weren’t required to have a video-capable phone. Interpret also note that current iPhone users were not more likely than anyone else to have watch mobile video before they bought the device.

Another positive point for the iPhone is that after seeing a 2-minute video about watching video on the iPhone, nearly three-quarters (73 percent) of non-owners say they are interested in watching video on an iPhone, and 42 percent say they are “extremely” or “very” interested…This isn’t a direct halo effect since the people said they were interested in seeing video on an iPhone rather than their own mobile phone, but it’s reasonable to assume that some of them at least will check out video on their handsets.

Ad-Supported Needed: The survey also found that 66 percent of iPhone owners and 73 percent of non-owners said they prefered free, ad-supported content. A third (34 percent) of iPhone owners would consider a monthly subscription model while only 21 percent of non-owners would, and 28 percent of iPhone users would consider pay-per-download, with the corresponding figure for non-users coming in at 20 percent.
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