5 Comments

Summary:

Web developers have been more and more concerned with coding for mobile devices. Now that the iPhone is here, I wonder if that may change further. The iPhone – unlike most other cellular phones on the market – browses using a wide-screen web browser and the […]

Web developers have been more and more concerned with coding for mobile devices. Now that the iPhone is here, I wonder if that may change further. The iPhone – unlike most other cellular phones on the market – browses using a wide-screen web browser and the touch interface makes it easy to do so.

I’ll be interested to see if web developers will come up with a pseudo-mobile development process specifically for Safari on the iPhone. Meaning, will designers embrace the iPhone’s click-to-zoom interface, making some elements a certain size for optimal viewing/reading, leading to an Apple-specific mobile development practice?

Will the use of web 2.0 apps (the standard SDK for the iPhone…) see a slight transformation so as to be optimized for iPhone viewing? I’ve got to believe there’s going to be a noticeable shift of some kind that results from this new piece of technolust.

If you’re developing mobile web pages/applications, I’d love to hear your take on this possible shift in development practices.

EDIT:
Thanks to Tom for pointing out an error that was published. I accidentally posted with 2 different thoughts combined in 1 and it sounded likea broad and absolute statement which was not intended. It’s been udpated.

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  1. If you use web standards, and its accessible then it’s really up to Apple…etc… to make devises that can logically interpret and reorganize it right? I know I won’t be making any drastic modifications.

  2. Tom Hughes-Croucher Friday, June 29, 2007

    I hate to say it but this is flagrantly untrue.

    “The iPhone – unlike every other cellular phone on the market – browses the web on a full-featured web browser (Safari)”

    My Nokia N80 from last year ran the Yahoo homepage with all it’s AJAX using the brower shipped with the phone. Which like the iPhone is Webkit. My N95 also shipped with a WebKit browser installed.

    Opera also make 2 flavours of their browser for mobile devices. Both of which are within a hair of passing the ACID 2 test.

    While the iPhone is cool, these sweeping statements don’t make this blog which I enjoy reading or Apple advocates generally look good.

  3. Chris Messina Sunday, July 1, 2007

    While most sites should be fine, I do think that new browser features like Canvas and SVG will become more popular (SVG should be coming to the iPhone in a release later this year) for web developers.

    We’re actually going to be talking about these issues at the upcoming iPhoneDevCamp… it’d be great if you could pimp it to your readers!

  4. Just a quick whoo hoo…

    iPhone works with Meebo.

    This means web 2.0 AJAX-based IM.

  5. Considering there is a whole industry devoted to HCI, it’s a wonder there isn’t a definitive set of rules for web development. Although, if you look at every area that “web development” covers, said list would be around 1 km long once it came out the printer.

    The joys of working in an industry and almost requires you to be an expert in everything. Well, at least the ones that can be abbreviated to an acronym that is pronounced nothing like its spelt :)

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