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Summary:

If you’ve heard about Quicksilver but have been too timid to familiarize yourself with it, or to peek under the hood a bit, this screencast is for you! Perhaps too often, we (as in the collective web) focus our attention on the cutting edge features of […]

If you’ve heard about Quicksilver but have been too timid to familiarize yourself with it, or to peek under the hood a bit, this screencast is for you!

Perhaps too often, we (as in the collective web) focus our attention on the cutting edge features of Quicksilver. Unfortunately that can make for a steep barrier to entry into this amazingly powerful program. So I wanted to take a step back and show a simple trick or two that makes Quicksilver valuable to the new user (either of Quicksilver, or the Apple platform in general).
Quicksilver Rocks!
To those veterans of our favorite launcher, this screencast may not be much for you, and I do apologize for that. I’ll do my best to expose something new and exciting with Quicksilver in the coming week or two. But for those who really don’t know Quicksilver from a hole in the ground, this aims to serve as a useful [visual] primer on getting started with a life-altering application. (I’m serious about the ‘life-altering’ thing.)

Following a simple but useful function of Quicksilver, I’ll cover the Preferences and various sections within that can help enhance your Quicksilver experience. For those who have followed along with my past screencasts, this isn’t another ‘Setup’ – instead this is aimed at explaining the various functions in Preferences, like Rescanning catalogs, finding information about plugins, and things of that nature.

You can grab this screencast in .mov format directly (below), or you can subscribe to our new TAB Screencasts feed here, or via iTunes.

Quicksilver – The Beginner’s Walkthrough (mov)
20 mins / 138 mb

This is a long one (apologies if it gets repetitive, but I wanted to cater to the new-to-Quicksilver crowd). Please feel free to leave questions below in the comments section, and we’ll do our best to answer them promptly.

By Nick Santilli
  1. I want QuickSilver on my iPhone. I already think that way (regarding how I use my computer) – I don’t think it can be done with a web-app, though. Give Alcor a real SDK!

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  2. Sorry, but what are the names of the icon sets you are using?

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  3. This is a good (& up to date) starting point for anyone wanting to get into Quicksilver.
    I can see a few sites referencing it in the future.

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  4. [...] Screencast: Quicksilver for Beginners – The Apple Blog Vídeos de iniciação ao Quicksilver. (tags: The_Apple_Blog Nick_Santilli Quicksilver) [...]

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  5. [...] Quicksilver: “A unified, extensible interface for working with applications, contacts, music, and other data.” – This application is slick. I have it setup to activate by pressing the Command (Apple key) + spacebar keys and then use it to launch applications, open, move, copy and compress files, open folders, launch web pages and more. And I haven’t come anywhere close to using it to it’s fullest potential. The quicksilver docs and 43folders.com is probably as good a place as any to get started learning about using this amazing tool. Update (6/30/07): Here’s a very informative screencast to get you going — Quicksilver for Beginners [...]

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  6. I’ld like to thank you for this awesome walkthrough! I’ve been relunctant to using QuickSilver because it seemed complex, but I was wrong, now I’m addicted.

    Thanks!

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  7. Andrew – I’m glad it’s been useful for you. I want to do 1 or 2 more Quicksilver entry screencasts. Just trying to determine what items to demo. Watch for them in the next week or so.

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  8. [...] personalmente prefiero Quicksilver (ver screencast via: theAppleBlog) Aunque de pronto es un poco mas complejo de manejar para alguien que no tenga mucho tiempo como [...]

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  9. [...] Quicksilver – Screencast for beginners – The Apple Blog [...]

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  10. It seems to me that KISS (Keep it simple, stupid) is implied here. Why use all these new to learn key commands when you can access the same crap by double clicking the folder on the desktop? (which, chances are it’d take less time to do so) Unless QS’s sole purpose is to allow the user to enjoy their desktop background to it’s maximum potential and to complicate their computing experience, I find it pretty unnecessary. Maybe theres something I’m missing?

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