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Summary:

MIT researchers successfully lit a light bulb without wires about two meters away from an energy source, but only 40% of the transmitted energy was used. WiTricity, as they called the approach, is still in the conceptual stage so you won’t see any consumer devices using […]

WitricityMIT researchers successfully lit a light bulb without wires about two meters away from an energy source, but only 40% of the transmitted energy was used. WiTricity, as they called the approach, is still in the conceptual stage so you won’t see any consumer devices using the technology for quite a bit, if ever. For starters, the whole contraption is fairly large when compared to the device being powered: the 60W bulb was connected to copper coils with a two foot diameter. Still, the use of electromagnetic resonance shows potential and that thrills me: we really haven’t seen any major usable leaps in portable power technologies for ages.

(via Ubergizmo)

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  1. No thanks. Just heard a report on radio (Dr. Ronald Hoffman, NYC) where train operators that sit near some electrical component (sorry, I forget which) get more of some type of cancer (sorry again, forget which) than other employees on the same train. He also mentioned that health risks from exposure to hybrid cars is still and open issue, though he gave no evidence that there is anything harmful in exposure to hybrid motors.

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  2. Wireless power is easy but show me a picture with one of designers standing in between the power transmitter and receiver. Electromagnetic induction has been around a long while but not very effective over distance.

    This appears to be evanescent wave coupling which won’t kill/ cook you like Radio and microwaves, but it’s not very effective over extremely long distances, like an entire building.

    Still cool stuff I hope someday to be able to not carry batteries around and just have everything work.

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