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Summary:

The Nokia N800 continues to surprise, even as I box mine up to send back to Nokia: apparently, you can now run FreeSWITCH on the N800 thanks to a pre-release version. I wasn’t familiar with this platform, so here’s a brief description I read on Ken […]

Nokian800thumbThe Nokia N800 continues to surprise, even as I box mine up to send back to Nokia: apparently, you can now run FreeSWITCH on the N800 thanks to a pre-release version. I wasn’t familiar with this platform, so here’s a brief description I read on Ken Camp’s Unified Communications blog:

"FreeSWITCH is an open source telephony platform designed tofacilitate the creation of voice and chat driven products scaling froma soft-phone up to a soft-switch.  It can be used as a simple switchingengine, a media gateway or a media server to host IVR applicationsusing simple scripts or XML to control the callflow.
Wesupport various communication technologies such as SIP, H.323, IAX2 andGoogleTalk making it easy to interface with other open source PBXsystems such as sipX, OpenPBX, Bayonne, YATE or Asterisk."

For any N800 owners that aspire to run a full blown telephony platform on their handheld, you can find the installation code right here. Amazing!

(via Nokia N800 Blog)

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  1. When the entire global phone system crashes, I’ll know who to blame…

  2. Frank McPherson Monday, May 14, 2007

    Why?

  3. John Inkmann Tuesday, May 15, 2007

    this begs the question: why are you boxing up your N800 and sending it back to Nokia?

  4. Kevin C. Tofel Tuesday, May 15, 2007

    John, the sole reason is that it was a loaner / review unit from Nokia. I’d consider buying it except for the fact that my Q1P UMPC can do everything the N800 does.

  5. Nilesh Trivedi Wednesday, May 16, 2007

    A lot of people want to experiment with freeswitch but are put off because of absence of a packaged installation. A simple .deb file for debian/Ubuntu would go a long way.

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