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Summary:

After writing about Dell offering Ubuntu this afternoon, I finally got off my behind and installed the lastest version, which is 7.04. I ran into some issues when installing Ubuntu under Parallels on the Mac; sure enough, thanks to a recent Lifehacker post, I found a […]

Ubuntu_in_parallels

After writing about Dell offering Ubuntu this afternoon, I finally got off my behind and installed the lastest version, which is 7.04. I ran into some issues when installing Ubuntu under Parallels on the Mac; sure enough, thanks to a recent Lifehacker post, I found a fantastic step-by-step process at SimpleHelp.

There were a few kinks in the steps, so be sure to read through the comments of the post as there are proven workarounds for the few issues. I just completed the installation a short while ago, so I don’t have much to say about it yet. What amazes me however, is that on a single piece of hardware I can literally run three completely different operating systems at the same time. Virtualization has to be up there when looking for "the next big thing" in productivity and mobility. Just for kicks, I wrote this entire post on Firefox running Ubuntu in a virtual machine that really doesn’t exist. ;)

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  1. Aaron Walker Wednesday, May 2, 2007

    Kevin, are you going to update your Ubuntu experiment for those of us who keep hearing about it? Thoughts? Issues? Usefullness? Is it worth the install for Tablet/Windows users?

  2. Kevin C. Tofel Wednesday, May 2, 2007

    Aaron, I’ll probably post updates as I find features that help with mobility; it’s good to keep a broad perspective with hardware, software and operating systems, in my opinion. There’s no question that Ubuntu can be useful and keep you productive but of course it all depends on your needs. Most users need a browser, office suite of some type and media player: Ubuntu is perfect for that. When you start desiring very specific functionality you may run into issues because the spectrum of available products is much smaller than for apps that run on Windows. Often, there are good alternatives, but not always.

    I don’t see any distro of Linux coming close to replacing a Windows Tablet PC for a heavy-duty tablet user at this point. This functionality is likely too “niche” for developers to focus on in the Linux world at this time. Since you can run Ubuntu in a “Live CD” mode, I highly recommend folks download, burn and try it. It’s free and you aren’t installing the OS so there’s little to no risk. If you like it, you can then install it.

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