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Summary:

Can Americans dream about a day when they get a 100-megabit-per-second broadband connection, delivered over fiber? FTTH Council, says yes, and is pushing the US government to adopt a 100 Megabit Nation policy. The Council says that we have the technology, and the carriers (and cable […]

ftthcouncil.gifCan Americans dream about a day when they get a 100-megabit-per-second broadband connection, delivered over fiber? FTTH Council, says yes, and is pushing the US government to adopt a 100 Megabit Nation policy. The Council says that we have the technology, and the carriers (and cable providers) have the networks to make it all a reality – with a little pressure from Washington D.C.

The FTTH Council’s recommendation included the goal of extending, through both private and public sector initiatives, affordable next-generation broadband to a majority of Americans by 2010, with universal availability by 2015.

The Council wants Congress and the President to act fast on this – otherwise we will be stuck in the slow lane, of sub-10 megabit per second speeds. Every day we twiddle our thumbs, we lose some of the edge when it comes to developing clever ways to use the bandwidth. My simple argument is that what x86 was to the PC era, bandwidth is to the broadband era. The more bandwidth we have, the more innovative ways we will find to use it, thus creating another cycle of innovation.

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  1. Robert Dewey Monday, April 16, 2007

    100Mbps would successfully support widespread thin-client computing. This is an area I’ve messed around with; I can run a full-fledged OS (Knoppix) from the CD-ROM of a PC connected to a 100Mbps hub. I can run things like GIMP, Open Office, and other things without much lag.

    The secret is caching a lot of this stuff into the RAM at boot. You can also use a section of your hard drive as an encrypted swap…

    It’s pretty interesting, and it WILL open up gateways to new types of computing.

  2. 2015 ? ;) It’s 2007 here in Europe and Some People already have 200Mbps symetric ;)

  3. Benjamin Koe Monday, April 16, 2007

    Singapore is planing gigabit to the home (possibly FTTH) by 2015.

  4. Interesting Om, the adoption rate also would be awesome, current US broadband adoption rate is 1% per month (home users) and has reached 80%+.
    I hope we will have our data in cloud and move around…

    kind rgrgds
    saran

  5. The US continually seems to be the unwieldy monster, trudging toward technological development. Maybe if we spent half as much on these things as we do our star wars defense capabilities (particle beams, airborne lasers, metastable nuclear isomers, etc) we might be happily on our way toward realizing our terabit fantasies. But alas, we are relegated to accepting technological hand-me-downs… I do hope we see 100Mbps some day, but it will probably be more interesting to see what the rest of the world has by the time we reach that mark.

  6. Rishi Sachdev Monday, April 16, 2007

    Actually in Hong Kong the internet speeds go up to 1Gb/s for 220 dollars a month from HKBN , symmetric so the U.S. is way way way behind.
    link

  7. i hate all of you. I just blogged about the state of affairs in India and it’s pathetic.

    link

    help.

  8. Rishi Sachdev Monday, April 16, 2007

    Please realize that all the dollars signs on the HKBN website are in Hong Kong Dollars ( one eight of the USD ) while my reference to 1gb/s internet was in US dollars.

  9. 100Mbit full duplex is very common already in Stockholm… Waiting for Gbit now.

  10. Paul OFlaherty Monday, April 16, 2007

    We already have 100+ Mbps to the home here in Denmark and the government have mandated that 100Mbps will be the minimum you can have to the home.

    As far as I know they expect all service providers to have rolled out 100Mbps to all customers withing the next 18 – 24 months.

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