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Summary:

The number of podcasts continues to grow but actual revenue from podcasting isn’t budging much. BW is the latest to look at the podcast ad…

The number of podcasts continues to grow but actual revenue from podcasting isn’t budging much. BW is the latest to look at the podcast ad landscape, noting the lack of standards for placing ads on podcasts and the absence of solid audience measurement as two major impediments to push spending beyond last year’s estimated $80 million. While niche podcasts have their audiences, as is the case in other media, listeners and viewers crowd around popular programs like Grammar Girl; that show is one of the exceptions to the rev rule, bringing in nearly $100,000 this year.
Pulling in even a fraction of that amount remains a distant hope for most podcasters, even those that have the kind of popularity Grammar Girl has. A number of podcasters are working with FeedBurner, Podtrac and others to arrange deals with ad agencies and marketers. But commitments typically last three short months because advertisers are not completely convinced of podcasts’ effectiveness.
Related:
Online Video Grabs Headlines, While Online Audio Carves Out Its Niche

  1. You can do a lot better than this David.

    When you state that, "…actual revenue from podcasting isn’t budging much." you're showing that you did absolutely nothing but provide a weak synopsis of an already very weak and shallow Business Week report on podcast advertising.

    Over the last two months RawVoice has negotiated our strongest ad deals yet that put more money in podcasters pockets than ever before. We're also starting to see some podcasters doubling up on sponsorships in situations where they made their own contacts. For Immediate Release is a great example of that.

    Does an ad deal not exist if it hasn't been negotiated by Podtrac or Feedburner?

    The fact is that the ad market for podcasts is growing faster than it ever did for blogs or any other form of independent media. Podcasting itself is only two and a half years old and RawVoice has hundreds of podcasters earning some kind of revenue from their shows.

    Compare that to blogging. Dave Winer started the first blog in 1997. How many bloggers were engaged in advertising deals in mid-1999? Probably none.

    It's bad enough that we continue to get very shallow reports on the impact of podcasting from mainstream sources like Business Week. I would hope that a great resource like PaidContent would aspire to a higher standard.

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  2. nice condescending tone. i think you need a bit more cheese to go with your whine.

    and CPA deals with response rates well under 1% are not what I'd call "strong ad deals"

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