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Summary:

Jason emailed me this morning with the great idea to start a TAB Folding@Home team. I’ve participated in the Folding@Home project in years past but it had fallen off of my radar recently. If you aren’t familiar with F@H, it’s a distributed computing project that makes […]

Jason emailed me this morning with the great idea to start a TAB Folding@Home team. I’ve participated in the Folding@Home project in years past but it had fallen off of my radar recently.

If you aren’t familiar with F@H, it’s a distributed computing project that makes use of your unused CPU cycles to help run one of “the largest supercomputers in the world.” By being a part of this “supercomputer” you help scientists ultimately find the cure to diseases or alteast help them learn more about them.

Joining the TAB team just helps give people a bit of an incentive to install this thing an do our best to become one of the top teams!

You can download the necessary software here.

TAB’s team ID is 62487 so be sure to put that in when you’re configuring the app.

You can keep track of our team’s progress here.

  1. Why not just joing the Apple team 1991?

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  2. Because…

    Seriously though…why have different teams at all? Because it’s fun. People are certainly free to join whatever team they want or start their own team for all I care.

    I’m just giving people an option.

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  3. As MacRat said I too would hope people will join the Mac OS X team (1991). It’s ranked #10 and is on it’s way to becoming the #5 team of the project!

    http://folding.extremeoverclocking.com/team_overtake.php?s=&t=1971

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  4. Why do I even bother posting this stuff…

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  5. Thanks Josh! I joined up this afternoon and will single-handedly overtake the infamous Apple 1991 team…

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  6. It’s not a personal attack Josh. Just trying to promote Mac users to be seen more unified instead of diluting our contributions across multiple groups.

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  7. Can someone define “unused CPU cycles”?

    I think that rather it means ‘unused CPU capacity’, which means that your CPU runs closer to 100% all the time, instead of just when you’re doing something. You pay for this with a bigger utilities bill. I don’t have a problem with that, but I do have an issue with it being presented as “your unused CPU cycles are being wasted so it’s not costing you anything to do this”.

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