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Summary:

A study published Sunday at a meeting of the American College of Cardiology showed that a doctor’s ability to detect a heart problem was doubled after listening to heart sounds on an iPod. Nearly 150 medical students listened to the five most frequent heart murmurs on […]

A study published Sunday at a meeting of the American College of Cardiology showed that a doctor’s ability to detect a heart problem was doubled after listening to heart sounds on an iPod.

Nearly 150 medical students listened to the five most frequent heart murmurs on an iPod 400 times in a single, 90-minute session for the study. That session improved the rate of detection by stethoscope from 40 to 80 percent among generalists.

The study was done by Temple University cardiologist Michael Barrett, who said the ability to detect heart anomalies is essential to finding a range of cardiac problems and can reduce the number of unnecessary tests like echocardiograms and stress tests.

Does anyone still think the iPod’s audio quality isn’t good enough?

Via AFP

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By Eddie Hargreaves

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  1. So you couldn’t do this on any other MP3 player then? Has to be a iPod? Gimme a break.

  2. interesting info. i do like the ipod sound quality. the other thing that is interesting for me is to watch things like dvds on my ipod. the picture is excellent. i watch the dvds when i am traveling or commuting as a passenger. (not when i am the driver)
    i got the software to transfer my dvds to my ipod at the above address.

  3. It’s good enough for fiction. On at least one occasion on House, MD an iPod was used (amplifying heart sound) to make a diagnosis.

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