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Summary:

For someone I have never met, I sure am jealous of Sacramento, CA.-resident, Jim Husman, who according to his phone company, SureWest Communications has one of the fastest residential Internet connections in America. Actually make that the fastest symmetric residential connection – for there are some […]

For someone I have never met, I sure am jealous of Sacramento, CA.-resident, Jim Husman, who according to his phone company, SureWest Communications has one of the fastest residential Internet connections in America.

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Actually make that the fastest symmetric residential connection – for there are some parts of the country where Cablevision and Verizon FiOS have similar asymmetric speed offerings.

SureWest’s press release claims (a boast that hasn’t been really verified) that Husman is the first customer of the independent telecom operator to get a over 50 megabits per second upstream and downstream speeds on this new broadband network.

Now this ain’t cheap: $260 a month! Throw in extras like digital TV, high definition TV, local and long distance telephone, and PCS wireless and your monthly bill could hit a whopping $415 a month. Given that Sacramento is a couple of hours away from San Francisco, we wonder when our local incumbents – Comcast and AT&T – will boost our speeds. We are still stuck at 6 Mbps! Sigh!

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  1. Lol, I am on vacation in india and broadband here means 256k or 512k. I am using my blackberry on airtel’s gprs network to respond.

    What we need is highspeed wireless :-) Then I can work anywhere – say like south beach.

    Okay when I get back to Miami I am going to look for 50mb up and down. Go surewest …Sweeeet.

  2. The speed in SF area is still much better than whats availabe in India (in the name of broadband)at the moment…

  3. One of my co-workers lives in Sac Town and has service through SureWest. While he doesn’t get 50mb (not sure what rateplan he’s on), he regularly gets 10mb in both directions. Furthermore, his upstream is frequently better than his downstream. Still very impressive, if you ask me.

  4. Mauricio Freitas Wednesday, March 21, 2007

    Your future broadband: 50MBps downstream and upstream …

    Found this through GigaOM today, and got to the press release:[quote]Meet the Man With the Fastest Internet Speed in the CountryROSEVILLE, Calif., March 19 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ — To the amazement of those watching, Jim Husman zipped around his compu…

  5. Wow, 50mb.. and to think Time Warner Cable here in Nebraska just allowed us to get a premium 10mb service for an additional $9.95/mo. Road Runner Turbo Service with Cable AND/OR Digital Phone = $54.90/mo. That doesn’t include my digital cable, 20 HD channels, movie channels and DVR box. So I won’t even mention what my current monthly total is.

  6. Where I live in Sweden, I can get 100 Mbps symmetric Internet access for $60 a month.

  7. Ludvig A. Norin Wednesday, March 21, 2007

    The US is way behind Europe in this respect. I currently have 24/8, in my previous apartment everybody had 100mbps (fibre, even) synchrounous. I expect about 20% of swedish broadband cusomers can get 100mbps, usually at a pricepoint around $40-60/month.

    Move to Sweden! :-)

  8. Here in Latvia, I get 5Mbps down, 512kbps up on DSL for around USD 35 per month. My wife and I keep a place in Stockholm where 100 Mbps down and 10 Mbps (??)up is part of the rent (the fee for a coop apartment). In parts of Riga, Lattelecom already offers 10 Mbps, as do several competing ISPs. It looks like my Riga connection will jump to 10 Mbps as IPTV is launched (for ordinary TV sets, with new modems and decoders). 24 Mbps DSL is around the corner. 3.6 Mbps HSDPA is available from three mobile operators, as is 1 – 2 Mbps EV DO internet. Both of these wireless services may see speed leaps during 2007. Alas, poor Om :).

  9. how on earth are you people getting these blazing speeds? surely you’re not using pots lines or cable, but fiber?

  10. Arvind Satyanarayan Wednesday, March 21, 2007

    And in the UAE, residential broadband remains at 512K with some lucky people on 1 mbps

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