Summary:

While NewTeeVee’s buddies at GigaGamez get to work the Second Life beat, thanks to screen capture and Second Life’s internal camera tools, there’s plenty of video leaving the online world and turning up at places like YouTube. I figured I’d make up for crashing Linden Labs’s […]

While NewTeeVee’s buddies at GigaGamez get to work the Second Life beat, thanks to screen capture and Second Life’s internal camera tools, there’s plenty of video leaving the online world and turning up at places like YouTube. I figured I’d make up for crashing Linden Labs’s GDC party and eating their lambchops by sharing some machinima videos from the metaverse.


We’ll start with the trendy stuff. Whether or not you believe the hype about Second Life, it’s certainly true that what was a really nerdy space has become increasingly one known for marketing and promotional efforts. In this video, aged rockstars U2 look to score some online hipster cred with a concert appearance. Is it just me, or is there something philosophically jarring about seeing a scruffy Bono avatar singing Sunday Bloody Sunday?

Warning: some clips may contain cartoon naughty parts and simulated violence.

Of course, Second Life is best at marketing and promoting Second Life! This user-created machinima video, “Second Life: Get One” won the 2006 Second Life movie trailer contest sponsored by Linden Labs.

If there’s a classic moment in Second Life television history, it’s the attack on Anshe Chung at C/Net’s virtual offices. Consider it in the grand tradition of painting mustaches and lewd speech bubbles on advertising posters. Best part has to be the choice of soundtrack.

I couldn’t find any video of the aftermath of a griefer attack on John Edwards’ Second Life campaign headquarters, but I could find this video by the perpetrators, Patriotic Nigras. Here, they pull a prank on an ‘adult’ club with lots of Super Mario madness.

The attacks on Jean-Marie Le Pen’s National Front headquarters in Second Life is, to me, the most interesting story in Second Life history. While griefers are certainly annoying, in this case there are a lot of people who don’t exactly have much sympathy for the National Front’s French nationalist message and oftentimes racist rhetoric. Depending on whom you ask, it’s either a reactionary attack on free speech or inspired activism.

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