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Summary:

A serious problem that some developers face is the distribution of updates and patches. With the size of content files and some game patches, bandwidth costs can go through the roof. That brings us to the point of this post: CacheLogic. CacheLogic is a peer to […]

A serious problem that some developers face is the distribution of updates and patches. With the size of content files and some game patches, bandwidth costs can go through the roof. That brings us to the point of this post: CacheLogic. CacheLogic is a peer to peer content delivery company based in England that has announced a new service that’s available immediately: VelociX for Games.

Using a mixture of P2P technology and available bandwidth, VelociX for Games claims that new content can be delivered to end users in minutes and for less cost to developers. The current CacheLogic network supposedly has a worldwide reach and quite a bit of bandwidth that is capable of smooth content delivery. According to a release, VelociX for games is going to offer developers flat fees for hosting that won’t be effected by burst downloads, the ability to prioritize content so that the newest available gets the most bandwidth allotted or micro-transactions to allow users to download at a faster rate.

If CacheLogic can deliver what’s promised, this could be great for smaller developers who don’t have the resources to run a high-level download service.

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  1. I’m wondering if those same small developers really have the resources to make games that require massive patches in the first place. I have to wonder how that all factors in as to patch size vs. playerbase.

    What we REALLY know is that some big developers apparently just don’t care too much about funding for patches in general, which this isn’t going to help. And you’d have to wonder if a hypothetical bunch of patches would even be necessary if the development practices weren’t so screwed.

    Now, what i’ve found is that archiving the patches is a huge problem. The one great thing STEAM does is completely remove the need to navigate FilePlanet or whatever. Reinstalling Quake, or some other old game, on the other hand, is a nightmare.

  2. I’m wondering if those same small developers really have the resources to make games that require massive patches in the first place. I have to wonder how that all factors in as to patch size vs. playerbase.

    What we REALLY know is that some big developers apparently just don’t care too much about funding for patches in general, which this isn’t going to help. And you’d have to wonder if a hypothetical bunch of patches would even be necessary if the development practices weren’t so screwed.

    Now, what i’ve found is that archiving the patches is a huge problem. The one great thing STEAM does is completely remove the need to navigate FilePlanet or whatever. Reinstalling Quake, or some other old game, on the other hand, is a nightmare.

  3. GigaOM » What’s On GigaNet Thursday, March 8, 2007

    [...] The Web WorkerNewTeeVee: Ping Pong at Next New NetworksNewTeeVee: Even MySpace wants to kill YouTubeGigaGamez: Cachelogic builds a p2p gamer CDN Share/E-mail | Sphere | Print | Topic: Asides | Tags: [...]

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