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Summary:

Megan over at Valleywag tipped us off to a project from Meetro‘s co-founder Paul Bragiel’s brother, Peter Bragiel called “The Walkstars.” Peter and his friends Josh and Sean are taking a week off and walking from Los Angeles to San Diego. That’s right, walking. “It is […]

Megan over at Valleywag tipped us off to a project from Meetro‘s co-founder Paul Bragiel’s brother, Peter Bragiel called “The Walkstars.” Peter and his friends Josh and Sean are taking a week off and walking from Los Angeles to San Diego. That’s right, walking.

“It is definitely not LA to walk — it’s like taboo,” Peter quipped on the phone from CompUSA in Long Beach where they were shopping for a memory card reader.

“This new form of travel video blogging — live, so that people can kind of join us,” he suggested. For instance, Peter’s brothers Paul and Daniel are currently accompanying the trekkers in a show of “brotherly love,” and anyone following the show can leave comments on the blog to send suggestions and support. They’ll probably get your messages tonight when they hope to arrive in Huntington Beach.

The walk will primarily follow the Pacific Coast Highway. Where are they staying? Well, they’re not entirely sure, and are looking for suggestions. Each night, while everyone rests their sore feet, Peter’s busy editing and posting the video.

“I’m an actor. Mostly I’ve been enjoying making my own stuff with my video camera,” Peter told me, but he’s also “always been a walker.” He and his brother Daniel had the idea about a year ago, first to document a walk across the country, then between San Francisco and Los Angeles and finally the shorter trip through the nearly uninterrupted suburban sprawl of the Southland. They’re planning on covering over 20 miles a day for a week.

  1. So what’s special about this efforts other than it’s being performed by a few computer/internet geeks that are completely ignorant of California history?

    For the curious, you can still walk the almost entire length of California by following the route established by Catholic Missionaries in the mid-18th century (1769). Each mission was originally built to be distance one day’s walk apart. Many of the original mission sites are still extant, and some offer lodging on-site (or very nearby).

    Populist Overview from Wikipedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_missions#Missions_in_present.E2.80.93day_California_.28U.S..29

    Callifornia Missions Study Association
    http://www.ca-missions.org/

    California Missions Foundation
    http://www.missionsofcalifornia.org/missions/index.html

    Clearly “walking tours” of California offering far more detailed documentation than today’s standard videoblogger have been readily available for more than 200 years.

    Frankly, I’d have been more impressed if “The Walksters” had partnered with one of the many California Historical Societies, in an effort to contribute to a “real world” community.

    I’m just sayin’

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  2. I actually did mention the mission trail to Peter, and it was news to him. The NewTeeVee news is that, unlike the early Spanish missionaries, travellers can now upload clips filmed on their journey to YouTube as a travelogue. It’s a lot faster than the old burro-band network.

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  3. YouTube more reliable of burro-band network? Now that’s truly amusing:) Never mind the eternal quantity vs. quality argument. As a benchmark for “Web 2.0 technology” I’ll take an 18th century Franciscan friar’s hand-written diary over a YouTube post any day.

    Need I remind you of the long-standing IETF RFC 1149 – “A Standard for the Transmission of IP Datagrams on Avian Carriers” (1990)? Or the Israeli project that compared the reliability homing pigeons to contemporary packet switching technologies (2004)? A New Israeli test confirms: PEI (Pigeon Enabled Internet) is FASTER then ADSL:

    Long Live The Tubes!

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