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Summary:

Jenn from Pocketables shot me a note last night about an eleventh Sony UX model: the UX-380N. She says, "Other than the UX380N’s 40GB hard drive and silver casing, it is identical to the UX390N". A quick trip to the SonyStyle store verifies Jenn’s observations and […]

Sony_ux_1Jenn from Pocketables shot me a note last night about an eleventh Sony UX model: the UX-380N. She says, "Other than the UX380N’s 40GB hard drive and silver casing, it is identical to the UX390N". A quick trip to the SonyStyle store verifies Jenn’s observations and you can order this handheld for $1999 direct.

My question is: when is enough essentially enough? Why have eleven or more models with different designations? Is that helping or hurting sales? Does it add confusion to a niche market that’s already confused by the purpose of these devices? I’m no marketing genius, but I’d consider just a few products in the same line and allow for consumer customization. You know it’s bad when you need this kind of comparison chart to tell the difference between all of these UX’s!

  1. The multitude of model designations would be fine if it followed some sort of logical system, but it’s basically “UX” + “random number” + “one or two letters… maybe”. The designations seem to mean something, but there’s no discernible pattern. They need to release a formula or something.

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  2. The model numbers probably mean something to Sony Japan, not us.

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  3. Well, it’s eleventh if you include every market, but it’s actually only the fourth U.S. model, right? Doesn’t seem all that confusing to me.

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  4. It’s only confusing because were IT guys a normal business user wouldn’t even know about the 11 odd models they would only be interested in the ones available in his or her country. Here in the uk we only have the ux1 to worry about.

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  5. hi:
    have it(Sony UX-380N) simcart mobile?

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