11 Comments

Summary:

It’s been a few weeks since my initial Q1P battery life test (shown); that’s the one that got folks buzzing about an LED backlit screen in the Q1P. Is the screen LED backlit? I still don’t truly know even though I’ve had bunches of conversation with […]

Discharge_1_1It’s been a few weeks since my initial Q1P battery life test (shown); that’s the one that got folks buzzing about an LED backlit screen in the Q1P. Is the screen LED backlit? I still don’t truly know even though I’ve had bunches of conversation with folks and even took my Q1P apart. I’ll spare you the gory pics because they looked identical to those when Sammy was in the buff last year.

LED backlighting or not, I’m getting more runtime from the Q1P as well as a 40% brighter screen. I’ve shot a note to Samsung’s PR folks inquiring about this, but two weeks have gone by with nary a response. Samsung’s Customer Service was up to the challenge, but PR is falling well short of my expectations. In any case, I ran a scenario past Steve Paine over at Carrypad and then executed it.

Let’s set the stage and tell you what I did:

  • Used Battery Eater Pro v.2.7 to run the units down from a full charge.
  • Calibrated the battery before running the test.
  • Used the same physical battery to keep the variables to a minimum.
  • Ran BE Pro in Windows XP Tablet Edition 2005 on each machine.
  • Put the 1 GB of RAM back in the Q1 so both machines had the same RAM.
  • Created a custom Power Management scheme that essentially used zero power management.
  • Set the Q1 at full brightness; the Q1P at 60% as that appeared to be the same brightness.
  • Disabled any power savings in the BIOS.
  • Disabled Speed Stepping in the BIOS of the Q1P.
  • Turned WiFi on for both units.

Essentially, there are two remaining major differences in the units: the 900 MHz Celeron CPU vs. the 1 GHz Pentium M CPU, and any potential backlight technology. I tried to configure these units as close as possible for the test. BEAR IN MIND: under this scenario, this should simulate pushing the UMPCs as much as possible for the near-absolute minimum runtime. As a result, the runtimes from the test may appear lower than you would expect, but remember, this simulates your usage of the UMPC full-out as long as possible. So what did we find?

Here’s a graph of the Q1 showing a runtime of 93 minutes:

Discharge_2

Here’s a graph of the Q1P showing a runtime of 116 minutes. It should be noted the battery might not have had a complete charge as well, however, I’ll throw that out of the equation.

Discharge_3

I think Steve said it best when I shot him the results: "So we’re seeing a 25% improvement. 15W drain with the Q1P. 18.7W drain with the Q1." That 25% improvement is relatively sizable, especially if you can apply it linearly in the real world as an example: 2 to 2.5 hours of runtime on a Q1 becomes 2.5 to 3.1 hours of runtime on a Q1P. That’s just a rough translation as usage conditions and power settings are all variable.

I’d still love to see some confirmation from Samsung on the Q1P backlighting, but even without that, here’s what we know:

  • At 280 nits, the Q1P screen is 40% brighter
  • Under nearly identical conditions, the Q1P runs around 25% longer than a similar Q1

This is certain to stir up more conversation, but quite honestly: it’s meant to. There’s gads of folks smarter than me that can understand the power technologies and approaches and there’s also oodles of people that are considering one or the other of these UMPCs, if not one from another manufacturer. The goal here was to provide as fair a comparison as possible and I hope it helps!

  1. Very interesting comparison of “theoretical” conditions!

    Now that you’ve got us so intrigued by the results, I can’t help but wonder what would happen if you considered the opposite sort of test — comparing “practical” configurations. I.e. setting the power management, screen brightness, BIOS settings and so forth to the sorts of levels you would use if the device was in use. It would be somewhat subjective based on your preferences, but it would also be a more real-life indication of relative battery endurance.

    My naive guess is that the Q1P might look even better under those circumstances, since the screen brightness could probably be set lower to get the same screen readability.

    Share
  2. Very interesting comparison! Now, if only the Q1P was not over 2000$

    Share
  3. Elo, the Q1P without the flash storage can be had for between $1200 and $1299. That’s the model I used in the comparison.

    Share
  4. I second Kevin, I got my Q1P for 1,129.00 and if you want you can wait and get it with Vista installed. Kevin has mentioned and put links where you can order it with Vista and I know CDW is one of the places to get. you would have towait till the end of the month to get it with Vista.

    Share
  5. Perhaps he meant $Canadian?

    Share
  6. Thanks Kevin and HG for the info. I was refering to Dynamism prices. I guess it can be had for less elsewhere!

    Share
  7. Kevin, does the Q1P have two stereo speakers, or are we talking about a mono situation?

    Share
  8. Two stereo speakers with the same SRS TruSurround XT support as the Q1. :)

    Share
  9. Hey Kevin, the Q1P screen must be hyper bright because I rarely have mine on the Q1 over 60% (my eyes can’t stand it!). Great test, by the way ;)

    Share
  10. I just purchased a new Q1 and I love it. Except for the short battery life. Is there any way to extend the battery power without carrying around the power brick?

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post