4 Comments

Summary:

As a long time eBook reader, one of the most aggravating aspects to digital book content has been a lack of availability for me. Yes, DRM implementations are a huge issue as well, but I can live with that. Not being able to find eBooks by […]

OpticbookseeAs a long time eBook reader, one of the most aggravating aspects to digital book content has been a lack of availability for me. Yes, DRM implementations are a huge issue as well, but I can live with that. Not being able to find eBooks by my favorite authors has really been a thorn in my side, so I still have to purchase some books in paper format.

Putting aside legal issues surrounding book scanning for a moment, I haven’t seen an abundance of outstanding scanning hardware until now. Bob Russell has a supremely detailed review of the OpticBook 3600 Book Scanner over at MobileRead that might have changed my mind. I’m withholding judgment until I see Part 2 of Bob’s excellent review, but this device is made for paper book scanning and conversion to a digital format. I’m not certain of the output formats yet, i.e.: Word, Adobe, etc… so I’m curious to see what the output options are.

Here’s a snippet to explain why this device might be a very compelling solution: "This product’s "claim to fame" is the ability to scan all the way to the edge of the scanning area, which allows you to easily scan a flat book page without pressing the spine down hard onto the glass as with a typical flatbed scanner. It is described in the product description as "Plustek’s patent pending SEE™ (Shadow Elimination Element) Technology includes a specially designed edge and lamp. This revolutionary technology allows half of the book to lay completely flat on the glass with the binding against the corner edge."

Part 1 was a great read and I’m looking forward to Part 2!

  1. Tracy over at Student Tablet PC likes this scanner too. They’ve got lots of tips and suggestions on scanning books over there. http://www.studenttabletpc.com (I think).

  2. I have been using one for almost a year and LOVE IT. I just have to scan in my books for graduate school (About 1.5-4 hours per book) and I have everything I need. I usually scan while watching TV. I save it as a PDF and read whenever I have a chance.

    -Marc

  3. The scanner works great. 2 years ago, Tracy and I did an 8-week paperless challenge and used this scanner extensively.
    See
    http://www.ericmackonline.com/ICA/blogs/emonline.nsf/dx/search.htm?opendocument&q=book%20and%20scan

  4. I’ve also had this scanner for a couple of years (had to import it from England at great expense) and it is brilliant. However, it doesn’t scan right up to the edge, I think it’s about 10mm short. This is annoying if you’re scanning in some paperback books. Having said that I always buy the tree version of a book and then scan it in and convert it to either text or Word before reading it on whatever device I have to hand.

    I’ve almost finished scanning in all my books and once you’ve set it up you can watch telly or whatever while you’re busy turning the book and pressing the button. It takes less than an hour to scan in a large book.

Comments have been disabled for this post