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Anyone who finds the current level of advertising on the Internet and in video games to be irritating, may want to consider joining a monestary. In a new study by the American Advertising Federation, nearly 90% of all American companies that were polled said that they […]

Anyone who finds the current level of advertising on the Internet and in video games to be irritating, may want to consider joining a monestary. In a new study by the American Advertising Federation, nearly 90% of all American companies that were polled said that they were planning on using part of their advertising budget on new media. Now that they can eliminate the middle man, is this the beginning of the end for game magazines?

According to Reuters, the study showed that 73% of executives polled were planning on spending around 1/5th of their ad budget on new media “to advertise in new media like video games or virtual communities.” Though at a much lower percentage, some were even planning on spending around 40% of their ad money. In another interesting statistic, the two most “surprising innovations of the past year as the ‘rush to Second Life virtual community space‘ and ‘the rise of YouTube,’ the video sharing Web site.”

Oddly enough, even though it’s great news for Internet outlets and game publishers, that budget has to be shifted from somewhere, and those most heavily hit will be magazines, TV and newspapers. Among those polled, newspaper was declared the most in need of work, but any format that’s losing advertising isn’t feeling too good. We’ve recently seen the death of the Official Playstation Magazine, other magazines are feeling the effect. As media keeps advancing, information is more readily available and faster. When that happens, older formats fall by the wayside, and just maybe it’s print’s time. Only time will tell.

  1. Why does everything have to be sold under the premise that it will support the thoretical sale of something else? Something must be making money, can we find out what it is and actually look at it? At what point do we go from subsidizing things we want cheaper to merely funding things that aren’t actually good enough to sustain themselves?

    In other words, are ads just becoming another kludge so that companies don’t have to worry as much about providing a decent product?

    I think time has already spoken. Those in print just don’t want to listen.

    Ok, so there’s this new medium that allows information to spread faster. Great for time-sensitive and fast-moving stuff. So what do print mags do? Try to keep up with that, fail miserably, and blame the resulting lowered quality on everything but their inability to adapt. Bleed readers and respect, rinse, repeat.

    Meanwhile, there’s a huge gap in reference material on the industry. Stuff with information you’d actually want to pull out every now and again. The collection of pertinent information that doesn’t become more and more irrelivant with age. Magazines doing that? None that are particularly accessible.

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  2. Why does everything have to be sold under the premise that it will support the thoretical sale of something else? Something must be making money, can we find out what it is and actually look at it? At what point do we go from subsidizing things we want cheaper to merely funding things that aren’t actually good enough to sustain themselves?

    In other words, are ads just becoming another kludge so that companies don’t have to worry as much about providing a decent product?

    I think time has already spoken. Those in print just don’t want to listen.

    Ok, so there’s this new medium that allows information to spread faster. Great for time-sensitive and fast-moving stuff. So what do print mags do? Try to keep up with that, fail miserably, and blame the resulting lowered quality on everything but their inability to adapt. Bleed readers and respect, rinse, repeat.

    Meanwhile, there’s a huge gap in reference material on the industry. Stuff with information you’d actually want to pull out every now and again. The collection of pertinent information that doesn’t become more and more irrelivant with age. Magazines doing that? None that are particularly accessible.

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  3. [...] “In a new study by the American Advertising Federation, nearly 90% of all American companies t… [...]

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  4. Xbox Video Games

    p night note hail the original sonic game consoles this list
    where s viva pi ata you guys ter get there is not only i ll
    share your opponents in the games in the ch

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