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Summary:

Most of the time, when you hear any mention of a lobbyist, it’s usually preceded by the word tobacco or something like that. Not this time! South Korean gold farmers have actually formed a lobby and are threatening to cause a ruckus. Never thought I’d be […]

Most of the time, when you hear any mention of a lobbyist, it’s usually preceded by the word tobacco or something like that. Not this time! South Korean gold farmers have actually formed a lobby and are threatening to cause a ruckus. Never thought I’d be able to say that MMO players were causing a ruckus. I can cross that off my list of things to do.

Gold farming is, to a large portion of the MMO population, roundly despised, but apparently it’s very big business for South Koreans. In December of 2006, South Korea’s Ministry of Culture and Tourism proposed legislature to regulate the sale of game money for real money, on gambling sites as well as in MMOs. According to Game Politics, the Digital Asset Distribution Promotion Association (DADPA) is a lobby group that represents the farmers and their billion dollar industry.

When playing World of Warcraft in shifts turns into a billion dollar industry, kind of makes you wonder why you get up and go to work every day, doesn’t it?

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  1. No, it doesn’t.

    I love this line:
    “They argue that as long as players in wealthy parts of the world continue to provide a market for buying and selling of virtual currencies, there will always be someone willing to sit 10-12 hours a day gathering it for them.”

    Kind of like how as long as someone provides some loser grindfest, there will always be someone willing to sit there playing it for a monthly fee. It’s such an interesting juxtaposition; people wanting to buy gold always imply that they have some sort of value system for time, money, and quality of experience, yet the very act of paying a premium monthly fee for an MMO directly proves otherwise.

    But as for the rest of it, i’m mixed. On one hand, RMT can suck my balls. On the other, legitimizing it sounds like a way to eventually force MMORPG devlopers — who may also suck my balls — to take some fucking responsibility as to the time and effort players put toward earning things ingame.

  2. boy hot

    Of boy hot and more

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