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Summary:

Despite some spew earlier in the week that Jobs lied about iPhone running OS X, the truth came through and we find it really is running it. One of the things we can do on OS X machines is install applications, which will not happen without […]

Despite some spew earlier in the week that Jobs lied about iPhone running OS X, the truth came through and we find it really is running it. One of the things we can do on OS X machines is install applications, which will not happen without Apple’s help on iPhone. I’m sure the developers of the world thought “Wow, this will be a blast to write an app for a phone running OS X” and then had their dreams shattered when told “Not going to happen”.

Get over it.

The iPhone does something that we seem to forget in the realm of application development. It can access the internet. There’s probably a good chance that if you want to write something for the iPhone, this is the venue to do it at. Who really cares in this case, besides the Cocoa and C hackers, that it doesn’t do installs of software. I’ve said it many times, the software paradigm shift is to the web. The internet is the application platform for the iPhone. While the java(script) and flash issue seems unanswered right now, there is no doubt in my mind that Apple questioned this on purpose to gauge reaction before releasing iPhone.

Frankly, I’m happy that Apple decided not to allow application installs. You can call me an RDF victim if you want, there are worse things, like believing Windows Mobile 5 is productive to use. I’ve been a Palm user for years, and the only reason I install anything on it is because the default stuff from them sucks. It’s still better than WM5. A mini-OS X doesn’t sound crippling at all, but I’m not going to jump just yet. We’ll see how and why Apple was ready to announce this six months in advance. It seems that this device is a huge part of the digital lifestlye Jobs spoke of early in his return to Apple.

  1. JavaScript and Flash games? LOL!!!
    Internet office? With our (Russian) cost of gprs (edge)? No, thanks :)
    There are a million reasons for iPhone development.
    Also Jobs said that Apple will develop additional applications for the iPhone. And some 3rd party companies too.

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  2. I agree 100% that “cloud applications” are the direction to go. I run many open source versions of various web-apps on my home server so I can access them remotely (gregarius for RSS, Torrentflux for BitTorrent, etc.)

    The only add-on app that I see as essential for this would be a password safe. If they can implement that as a widget, then I’m sold. I want something like that to be on my person and not on the Intertubes.

    Hope you’re listening, Apple. ;)

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  3. I’ve actually read on the Adobe forums that the iPhone will NOT support Flash, in an effort to keep the device locked down. It really is a pity, since Adobe has been dying to lure developers to mobile development and what could be the coolest, most widely used phone will be inaccessible.

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  4. Sure, web-based applications are nice, and are much better now that we have rich interfaces and user-transparent interactions with the web server. That said, they are just one tool in a developer’s toolbox, and it’s important to use the right tool for the job.

    Writing web-based applications targeted at the iPhone is a joke. You’d only be able to use about 10% of the power of the user interface on this device. I can already think of a hand-full of applications that could interact with the specific features of this device, like the digital camera, microphone, etc.

    I do believe Mr. Jobs when he says they don’t want users installing applications because it has the possibility to disrupt core features like making phone calls. But there are plenty more reasons he didn’t mention.

    Let’s not forget this thing is also an iPod. If developers had full access to this device, it would only take a matter of days before you’d see music streaming and sharing applications out in the wild. The real reason we won’t see a public SDK is FairPlay.

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  5. #1 – Agreed.

    If the internet is the application platform for the future, let’s all just run Linux and junk our Macs… the reason the Mac experience is better is because of the apps.

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  6. Wow… they removed / censored the original first post. Guess that means this one will be gone soon too. Don’t post any opinions that disagree with the original post here folks.

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  7. Wow… they removed / censored the original first post. Guess that means this one will be gone soon too. Don’t post any opinions that disagree with the original post here folks.

    No, we removed it because it had absolutely nothing to do with this topic and was just flaming. It’s called moderation…not censorship.

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  8. I could not agree less with this post. I don’t know about anyone else, but if there is no chance that i can get a version of yojimbo for the iPhone than I will not get an iPhone. That program is what keeps me using osx.

    I also agree with #6 here, the reason I love the mac is the plethora of great shareware developers. It’s the only reason I’m not running ubuntu right now.

    To me the decision to not open the iPhone up to 3rd party development is as simple as this: DRM.

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  9. Steve Jobs stated in his keynote why it was announced in advance. FCC approval takes a few months and must be public. He said that he wanted to introduce the phone, not let the FCC do it for him.

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  10. “To me the decision to not open the iPhone up to 3rd party development is as simple as this: DRM.”

    For the love of God, how many times does this have to be said?!?!? The iPhone WILL BE OPEN TO 3RD PARTY DEVELOPEMENT. Jobs very , very clearly said that they don’t have to write every App for the iPhone.

    I think we will eventually see programs like Yojimbo, Daylite, and others working seamlessly with the iPhone.

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