11 Comments

Summary:

It is a damn shame that Findory.com is riding into the sunset. Greg Linden fought the good fight, but decided that it was time to move on. In his sayonara he writes: “I built Findory around the idea of applying Amazon.com-style personalization and recommendations to information. […]

It is a damn shame that Findory.com is riding into the sunset. Greg Linden fought the good fight, but decided that it was time to move on. In his sayonara he writes:

“I built Findory around the idea of applying Amazon.com-style personalization and recommendations to information. Search only helps if you can say what you want. Personalization helps you discover things that you could not have found on your own.”

Despite being drop dead simple, Findory never realized its true potential as an information discovery engine. It has all the makings of being a personal memetracker, something a lot of folks have been clamoring for. In contrast the general purpose memetrackers that follow conversations, like Techmeme and Tailrank keep growing. Any thoughts?

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  1. Kevin O’Keefe Sunday, January 14, 2007

    It is a shame. I’d been watching Greg and Findory for quite a while – both as a local company here in Seattle and as a possible tool for the legal industry.

    The legal profession is as information intensive as any industry. While we’re kicking out a ton of information on law blogs, our ability to absorb that info so as to advance the discourse on the law has not kept pace. I’d been looking at a tool like Findory as a possible way to do so.

    No idea how much you follow legal discussion on blogs, but I’d be interested in your thoughts.

    The law has so much to gain from exchange of data as its information that’s at the core of our actual work product.

  2. Robert Scoble Sunday, January 14, 2007

    TechMeme is growing faster cause it’s easier to tell people about it. “Hey, Om, you’re on TechMeme right now.”

    Personal memetrackers might be more useful, but they are a lot harder to show to other people and explain to other people.

  3. Robert,

    while that might be true, i think in the end the information – or the promise of social news – is the hyper personalization. i think findory got into the game too early.

    hopefully greg comes back with another idea right on time.

  4. What’s a “memetracker”?

  5. its funny how the sites that are succeeding in this segment are run by coders and are much more amateurish in presentation, whereas findory smelled much more like a traditional vc-backed startup.

  6. Lessons from Findory…

    Greg Linden is putting Findory to sleep: Development on Findory now will slow to a crawl. There may be new features, but they will be rare. I no longer will spend time exploring funding, biz dev deals, or recruiting. Findory…

  7. Seth Finkelstein Monday, January 15, 2007

    I’m sad to see it go, Findory was an interesting idea.

    TechMeme does something I call “serve the A-list”, in that it gives high attention earners even more attention, and focuses on mining what’s getting a lot of attention (no offense, Gabe). It’s really a very top-down system at heart.

    Contrary to myth, there doesn’t seem to be a lot of real interest in personalization. If you look closely, the hype is more gurus saying people should want it, than that people do want it.

  8. My problem with Findory was that the results were not immediately better than my other search/information sources. Perhaps over time it would have become better, but we all know how short our attention spans are.

  9. Thats a real pity, I thought it was a very interesting idea.

    As noted here and before, the digg, techmemes et al merely reinforce the hit based nature of the head of the (fairly constrained range of subjects) curve.

    I hope it was just early, and that a personal memetracker emerges again.

  10. Sebastien Provencher Wednesday, January 17, 2007

    Om,

    After I realized that social might be more important than local in the context of social local search a week ago, it looks like social might be more important than news in the context of social news sites. Unleashing the value of the network becomes as important as unleashing the value of the content and it creates a killer combo. Aristotle was right: “man is a social animal; he requires the companionship of other men and cannot find happiness if he leads the life of a recluse. “

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