5 Comments

Summary:

Okay something is going down at Wallop, the social networking start-up that emerged out of Microsoft research efforts. Last week, inventor Sean Uberoi Kelly left the company. Today, another executive is gone. Scott Arpajian, vice president of products, is leaving the company, for professional and personal […]

Okay something is going down at Wallop, the social networking start-up that emerged out of Microsoft research efforts. Last week, inventor Sean Uberoi Kelly left the company. Today, another executive is gone. Scott Arpajian, vice president of products, is leaving the company, for professional and personal reasons. He announced his departure sent out to Wallop colleagues earlier today. Wallop CEO Karl Jacob told us earlier that company is about to come out of beta soon. These exits are raising some questions in our mind, and require further mucking around.

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  1. Roy Schestowitz Saturday, January 6, 2007

    Doesn’t sound all that social to me. But it’s a rough sector. One must be among the giants to attract enough people to sustain a service.

  2. Wallop simply hasn’t caught on. A quick peek at the Alexa charts will show you all you need to know. Startups, whether in beta or not, should not have DECLINING traffic.

  3. The comment about declining traffic would be correct if Wallop was a website. Wallop is not a website, it is an application entirely written in flash. What Alexa measures is how many times Alexa users go to the Wallop home page and not even that once they auto login.

  4. Christian Becker Friday, January 12, 2007

    I have two friends in LA that just left Wallop also. It seems as though everyone is jumping ship I think because the company has no idea what they are doing and finally realized they got into the social market too late and when it was too saturated. I agree with the Alexa traffic reports, if the company was getting any traction they would be reporting higher numbers. I heard they tried to buy members of after hours club Xenii for a sum over a million dollars. That should tell you something about thier strategy. I got on the site one time and thought it was too slow, too sticky, confusing and had no value to the user whatsoever.

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