23 Comments

Summary:

It’s been 3 months since Apple updated OS X.4, and now there’s news that 10.4.9 is about to be seeded to developers. Obviously this will be the last update to Apple’s operating system before Leopard drops sometime in 2007. So what can be read from this? […]

It’s been 3 months since Apple updated OS X.4, and now there’s news that 10.4.9 is about to be seeded to developers. Obviously this will be the last update to Apple’s operating system before Leopard drops sometime in 2007.

So what can be read from this? Well we could assume that since the last update is just now being seeded, the final release may yet bee a couple of weeks out. So does that mean 10.5 is still a ways off? Possibly. But I suspect it’s more a case of Apple doing right by its customers who won’t jump on Leopard right away. There will still be many private consumers and businesses staying on the known/steady 10.4 platform for a while.

With Macworld starting little more than 2 weeks from now, we’ll clearly be hearing some Leopard details. Release date? I’m hoping for no later than Q1 2007. But what do I know. In the meantime I suppose we’ll have 10.4.9 to tide us over…

  1. How is it obvious that 10.4.9 is the last update? There *are* numbers higher than nine. No previous releases have gone to 10.x.10, but it’s not out of the question?

    Share
  2. One thing us switcher are usually not aware of is that later OS work better on older machines.

    I was stomped when hearing the Genius guy told me to put Tiger in my latop to improve it. My well trained Windows years raised all the usual flags, amongst which it would be a slow down of the system. I was surprised to hear the contrary.

    Most people however will skip a version. 10.3.9 people like me didn’t flock to 10.4 and will likely go to 10.5 The question is, will my 12″, G4, 1.33ghz be enough? That’s something I rarely hear about.

    Share
  3. It’s something you rarely hear about because Leopard’s system requirements haven’t been announced. Generally speaking, if your Macintosh is less than 5 years old, it will meet the minimum system requirements for the current operating system. It will certainly be supported if it’s less than 3 years old. The system requirements for the pre-release builds of Leopard call for G4, G5 or Intel Processor, built-in FireWire, DVD drive and 512MB RAM.

    Share
  4. lol @ Graham.

    I hope you realize that 10.4.10, when simplified, remains 10.4.1. The only way for Apple to continue updating Tiger would be to go to numbers in the thousandth (counting the ‘four’ and ‘nine’) column, such as 10.4.91.

    It’s a move that (correct me if I’m wrong) Apple *has* made before, but somehow I don’t find it likely, in this scenario.

    Not trying to be a jerk in the first paragraph; it’s an easy mistake to make. Just reminding everyone out there of how it would go.

    Share
  5. No. It would not got to 10.4.91. The next version number would be 10.4.10 because that would be the 10th update to OS X v10.4.

    As to the question of will we see 10.4.10 before Leopard? I don’t know, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see another update to 10.4.

    Share
  6. I just got a macbook and I’m considering updating to Leopard. But like Nick said I’m concerned that it will slow down my macbook.

    Share
  7. 10.4.10 can not be simplified sinde 10 cant be simplified.

    I know some people have problems with this (and its possible Apple is aware of this and keeps away from it on purpose) but its considered okay to do it within the industry. Its really easy to learn to live with as well as long as you dont go on expecting 10.5 getting out the next week because 10.4.9 is here ;-)

    Share
  8. the “.” in VERSION number of SOFTWARE is NOT a decimal point

    it’s NOT a decimal number.

    10.4.9 : it’s just version 10 (x) of mac os , 4th revision, nineth revision of the revision.

    you could do 20.546.462.B.6 rev5 addenda967 release 1300 if you wanted. you are free, developpers are free, marketing folks are freEEEEe.

    Some companies, as Sun, use more strange way to number their software (hello sun os 2.8 patch 43646432e456 , I mean solaris 8)

    an other example, the linux kernel is, for now, at version 2.6.19 (19th revision of the 2.6 kernel architecture. 6th modification of the original linux 2 design )

    it’s a freeeee world , free of the decimal rule !

    Share
  9. Before you try to correct someone (who is completely right) perhaps you read up first.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Version

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post