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Summary:

The New York Times adds another gee-whiz article to the volumes of ink dedicated to cell phone-based child tracking services. Just in time for the holiday shopping season! But this is one sci-fi gadget that’s no longer fi, thanks to advanced sci — satellite-based tracking based […]

The New York Times adds another gee-whiz article to the volumes of ink dedicated to cell phone-based child tracking services. Just in time for the holiday shopping season!

But this is one sci-fi gadget that’s no longer fi, thanks to advanced sci — satellite-based tracking based on Global Positioning System (G.P.S.) technology. — David Pogue

Maybe if ABI and David Pogue get together, they just might be able to meet ABI’s prediction that 20 million cell phone users in North America will be subscribing to “personal locator services” like kid-tracking by 2011.

  1. Hey Katie, don’t wait for David Pogue to call ABI. Remember, he doesn’t call techies, ever. :)

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  2. In cell phone years, 2011 might as well be 2111. In other words, any number you get is purely arbitrary and 20M is no more farfetched than any other.

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  3. Wasn’t there a lot of hype around GPS bracelets a few years ago, in some cases bordering fraudulent claims and products? Even Wherify, cited in the NYT article, used to have a 3D rendering of a bracelet on their site, as this Internet Archive entry shows – things have changed somewhat to more credible products.

    I remember an article in Wired around the subject, but I cannot recall the name of the company or the approximate date where it was published.

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  4. Do you want to start your own bussiness and you do have enough money, do you want to celebrate this xmas in the places of your dreams but not enough money to actualise it?then I am here to help all you hve to do is to mail me today via denson362@yahoo.com and your loan problem will be solved.

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