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Summary:

Just when you thought that old skool EVDO was fast, Sprint and Verizon are both rushing to light up their EVDO Rev A networks across the U.S. So far Sprint leads by just a margin in time to market and we briefly wrote about Sprint’s 10-city […]

Just when you thought that old skool EVDO was fast, Sprint and Verizon are both rushing to light up their EVDO Rev A networks across the U.S.

So far Sprint leads by just a margin in time to market and we briefly wrote about Sprint’s 10-city launch of its EVDO Rev A network yesterday. Customers in major cities like San Francisco, New York City and Los Angeles will be able to get average upload speeds of 300-400 kbps (compared with 50-70 kbps of current EV-DO networks) and an average download speed of 450800 kbps.

But Verizon Wireless isn’t wasting any time either. Engadget runs a rumor that says Verizon will launch its own Rev A upgrade on Friday in 10 markets too, including Sacramento and Salt Lake City. We talked to Verizon Wireless this morning and they said that the network has actually been live for a few months in a number of markets:

We’ve had a number of communities lit up with Rev. A for a few months, and expect to introduce a first PC card in the coming weeks. We won’t be announcing a launch of Rev. A until we hit a significant number of markets up and running, though. — Verizon Wireless, Jeffrey Nelson

Nelson wouldn’t comment on where the Rev A network is live and how fast the service is. Still, this is going to be an interesting battle for broadband subscribers. For now, Sprint is cheaper.

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  1. So what does this mean if I have an EVDO device I purchased like 8 months ago, will it work with rev A automatically?

  2. Sorry Jeffrey, you are pure out of luck. You might want to go and throw a fit with your retailer.

  3. EVDO – Direct Connect? Wednesday, December 13, 2006

    EVDO REV A is a must build out for Sprint. In the roadmap, the company will replace the IDEN direct connect service with Qchat (or similar product which requires high speed data). Expect fast and large growth of the Sprint REV A network.

  4. Damn, and I just bought a Sprint Power Vision card. Oh well…good thing I only spent $45 on it. Unfortunately, that means I’m already locked in to my 2-year agreement, and will have to buy a new card at retail. Argh!

  5. SlashChick, you should always check to see if you can get a discount on a new device if you do an early renewal on your contract (i.e. the 2-year clock starts anew). Always be willing to threaten to break your contract. The retail price for a Rev A cards is $200 – $250 . . .

  6. A month or 2 ago I noticed a nice change in the time it takes to connect and the download speed on my ev-do Verizon connection in Orlando. Not certain that we’ve got rev-a, but it sure does feel like something changed for the better.

  7. go get a UMTS/HSDPA data card from Cingular…speeds are the same, if not faster, and there are currently 69 major cities running the network…

  8. Where does Cingular’s wireless broadband for noteboods, 3G offering, fit in to this? Is it old, new, better, worse?

  9. Cingular is in a lot of markets, but last I looked, if you’re in Denver or anywhere on Colorado’s Front Range, you’ll have to stick with EV-DO from Sprint or Verizon. Cingular still doesn’t have 3G in that neck of the woods, or a lot of other markets for that matter.

  10. Until Cingular roles out HSUPA, EVDO Rev A carriers like Sprint and Verizon will kick their ass in uploads. If you do things like sending e-mail with attachments, you want the better upload performance. This is a rapidly changing field as every year for the next 3 carriers will be rolling out netowrk upgrades to leapfrog each other, many of them requiring new subscriber devices to get the benefit. Unless you don’t care about price or don’t mind haggling over contract extensions, I’d just pick the carrier who has the best overall coverage in the places you go and forget about trying to stay on the cutting edge of technology.

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