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Summary:

First James sells his flash-based Samsung Q1 SSD to procure a Fujitsu P1610 Tablet PC and now CTitanic (aka: Frank, or do I have it backwards?) gives the Fuji a 9 out of 10 in his review. Really now, what’s not to love when you have […]

Fujitsu_p1610_ctitanicFirst James sells his flash-based Samsung Q1 SSD to procure a Fujitsu P1610 Tablet PC and now CTitanic (aka: Frank, or do I have it backwards?) gives the Fuji a 9 out of 10 in his review. Really now, what’s not to love when you have an ultra-portable convertible Tablet PC that’s impervious to touchscreen vectoring?

Frank provides several comparison photos of the P1610 against his Samsung Q1 and eo v7110 UMPC; the size difference isn’t as large as you’d expect and Frank illustrates the point nicely. You’ll also find out in his review what the various benchmark specs are; this mini Tablet can hold its own in the performance department. So why not a full 10 out of 10? Frank feels that the price keeps it from a perfect 10; while the base price is around $1,650, recommended upgrades of RAM and hard-drive storage capacity bump the P1610 over the $2k mark. Always a trade-off in mobile devices…always a trade off.

  1. I didn’t really pay any attention to the P1610 until you started blogging about it. I haven’t been to get my hands on one, but you’ve got me sold just from your blog posts (and Rob Bushway’s video review). Now I just need the money…

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  2. The money, the money, that’s the main reason why I did not give it a 10!
    It’s too expensive!

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  3. depends on your needs and workstyle. for me, it wasn’t too expensive because it fit my needs workstyle.

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  4. But the whole TabletPC genre is expensive. When I bought my tc4200, the model I bought was going for about $2,400. I bought a refurb unit, maxed out with 3 year warranty, for $1,500. I’ll have to keep my eye out for a deal like that on the Fujitsu.

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  5. I have the P1610 now and must admit that it’s very nice. This purchase was made in Norway, and apparently we don’t have the Intellisonic software on it here. The microphone has an extreme amount of static, though, as soon as the sensitivty is turned up over about 10%. I even experienced static using a good headset that I have never had problems with (not usb).

    Is this common on this machine, or is there a problem with the one I received? Fantastic machine otherwise, although getting used to the size of the keyboard takes some time. ;)

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  6. Joe, I don’t have the static issues you have mentioned.

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  7. I love this machine, but I have to admin that there is one thing that has been bugging me. I am able to reduce the resolution to 1024×768, 800×640, and 640×480 is listed in supported modes as well. But why have they not put 800×480 is giving the ability to reduce resolution to a widescreen mode?

    I tried using Powerstrip, but the Intel GMA950 apparently doesn’t support custom resolutions. Can’t find a solution to this in any forums either.

    If you know of a workaround, please let me know. Very irritating that this didn’t occur to Fujitsu-Siemens. It seems like a quite obvious resolution to support.

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  8. Which “Fujitsu-Siemen” model are you referring to? Does it come with Intel chipset as well? Bear in mind that all Intel integrated graphics come with a curse, one that can only be lifted by installing the hacked version of OS X, whereupon you get the custom resolutions (800×500, 1024×640) that make gaming almost tolerable.

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  9. Why would you want to reduce the resolution? If you want more redable fonts and icons, simply adjust the DPI setting to 120DPI or more on the Control Panel->Display->Settings->Advanced screen. This will give you best of both worlds – large, clear fonts and icons, and beautiful 1280×768 resolution.

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