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Summary:

While not stricly work-related, this post by Alan Patrick of Broadstuff caught our eye. Seems New Media Age did a sponsored study on the mobile web usage of children between the ages of 6 and 13. We were reassured to find out that the next generation […]

While not stricly work-related, this post by Alan Patrick of Broadstuff caught our eye. Seems New Media Age did a sponsored study on the mobile web usage of children between the ages of 6 and 13. We were reassured to find out that the next generation of the mobile workforce isn’t exactly updating spreadsheets and distributing white papers on their cell phones — yet:

Children like to share music with their friends and most of them play
music on the move. They spend money on downloading ring tones and other resources. A minority access the Internet on their phones.

More from the report [PDF] after the jump.

  • 80% use MP3 players, mobile phones or iPods to listen to music on the move.
  • 29% of the children say they use the Internet on their mobile phones at least once a month
  • 29% say they share music with their friends via Bluetooth
  • 22 to 25% download ring tones, music, games and pictures.
  • 21% say they like to play music out loud in public places.
  • 22% send emails using their mobile phones
  • 18% buy things for their phones.
  • Most children who watch videos on their phones watch videos they’ve made themselves

While Alan sees this as good news for the mobile music industry, what we see is a generation that takes their browsing home with them and are accustomed to always-on connectivity, instant access to content and mobile social networking. Getting them to sit quietly in cubicles may prove difficult.

  1. [...] Katie finds enough evidence to suspect Google is investing in Chinese P2P company Xunlei. Om highlights the remarkable paydays top tech shareholders had in November. We know Bill Gates is beyond rich, but man! He sold $581 million worth of shares in a single month. Jackson ponders “a generation that takes their browsing home with them and are accustomed to always-on connectivity, instant access to content and mobile social networking.” He notes, “Getting them to sit quietly in cubicles may prove difficult.” [...]

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  2. We have a similar study out there – we call these workers “Out There”. You can read more about it at this blog entry here.

    Our main findings:

    People who are “Out There” are more likely to:

    * Value fame as an “asset”
    * Willing to share certain types of sensitive information on the web
    * Believe it is appropriate to criticize their organizations on the web
    * Believe that “organizations need to be more transparent to succeed”
    * Believe “there’s no harm in openly discussing the work I do inside my organization with others”

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  3. [...] While the phenom of always on connectivity and distributed workforces may be new to us a new report by New Media Age looks at how our kids are adjusting. From Web Worker Daily comes a thought provoking question: If the kids are always on the go doing whatever whenever, how will employers get them to sit in a cube? [...]

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  4. In other news;

    • 99% of Cats like fish!
    • 94% of children like to sing songs. Some also like playing and dancing.
    • 97% of phones can be used for calling other people.
    • 95% of WebWorkers should do less surfing.
    • 0,3% of Kids know that they free to do whatever they want.
    • 50% of a 100% is the half of something, but doesn’t really tell you anything.

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