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Summary:

Rule number 1: if your handheld looks like a giant Lego brick, people won’t buy it (unless it’s a Zune).Rule number 2: never (closely) name a handheld device after an established DRM scheme. MIU broke both rules with the M*Free device. The whole idea of adding […]

Hdcp

Rule number 1: if your handheld looks like a giant Lego brick, people won’t buy it (unless it’s a Zune).
Rule number 2: never (closely) name a handheld device after an established DRM scheme.

MIU broke both rules with the M*Free device. The whole idea of adding interchangeable cartridges for different functions sounds good, but darn it, we want those cartridges to be smaller than the Game Boy Micro! Even worse yet, is calling your device an HDCP HDPC. Now to MIU, "Hybrid Dual Portable Computer" might sound good, but to an HDTV-addict like me, I shudder when I hear "HDCP". See, that’s Intel’s DRM for protecting high-definition television content, otherwise known at "High-Bandwidth Digital Content Protection"!

Now that we’ve schooled MIU on the design rules, let’s see what have here. Hmmm….looks like someone took an OQO screen and clamped it on a Nintendo handheld for VGA resolution. There is a picture of a Windows XP splash screen here as well; could be interesting. On the back, we have the cartridge system for phone, digital audio and more, depending on which modules you own. The expected price is around $875 and to be honest, this portable follows the folding Origami concept better than most UMPCs, but I just can’t get over the rule breaking. How about you?

  1. I believe they are calling it a
    HDPC not HDCP but either way it is awfull.

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  2. Bill, rule #3 is always re-read the acronyms so you don’t confuse them like I did. ;)

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  3. Hello,

    The frontal side is like the Averatec UMPC proto

    http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/pcs/averatec-umpc-with-keyboard-167091.php

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