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Summary:

Both Paul Stamatiou and Ronald Heft have thrown out solid thoughts on the possibility of Parallels being bought by Apple. Boot Camp is lame, Virtual PC never made it off the starting line, and Parallels really has become a core app that Intel mac users have […]

Both Paul Stamatiou and Ronald Heft have thrown out solid thoughts on the possibility of Parallels being bought by Apple.

Boot Camp is lame, Virtual PC never made it off the starting line, and Parallels really has become a core app that Intel mac users have on their machines. It’s made leaps and bounds past anything else on the market and Apple really could use this app in the arsenal to help pull the market share even more.

What are your thoughts?

  1. Letting me play Half Life 2 at a full 30FPS with high graphics settings is NOT lame.

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  2. I would love to explain this in finite detail, but tonight I’ll be concise.

    No.

    Apple hasn’t shown interest in VM technology, though I think if they were smart and wanted to grow into the enterprise this would be an easy target. It wouldn’t happen on the desktop, Steve is too passionate about Mac OS X to have alternatives running with Apple’s name on it.

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  3. I think Todd makes a good point, but the truth is that Apple doesn’t buy much. Aside from a few exceptions — Coverflow, Shake, etc. — their M.O. is to develop in-house.

    I think if they did decide to go after the virtualization market, they’d be much more likely to develop their own solution and drive Parallels out of the market, no? Like they did with Konfabulator.

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  4. I don’t think Boot Camp is lame.

    Virtualization is great, but there’s no getting around the fact that running two OSs takes a wee bit of RAM.

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  5. Boot Camp + the new beta of Parallels that will let me boot from my Boot Camp partition = nirvana IMHO. Anyway I am one of those people who 90% of the time would be running Windows either for gaming or 3D software so being able to boot natively is a boon. Also I think that CrossOver is a product that Apple would have more interest in.

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  6. Apple has made it pretty clear that virtualization is not their thing. They might have a more final version of Boot Camp with the next OS, but they are not going to build in virtualization.
    This rumour has been around for a while, but it just keeps getting refuted.

    http://www.macworld.com/news/2006/07/07/windowsmac/index.php

    Notice the response to virtualization is “absolutely not.” This is not some run around where they are saying “i don’t think we are going to do this” to distract from the fact that they are.

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  7. I don’t know. I agree Parallels has come a long way, but it still has a ways to go. The new integration into mac (making the apps in Parallels part of the mac os x, in a sense) is a little goofy, it could use some work. We need direct3D support. I do a lot of video editing using apps such as After Effects, Premiere Pro, etc… This runs ok, but could be better. No gaming in Parallels because of the lack of graphics support as well. I use boot camp because it runs my windows the way it is supposed to be ran. Maybe if Parallels can accomplish these things, Apple should consider buying Parallels, or if Apple could accomplish these things themselves, well, then there may be something there.

    Well, there you go, those are my two cents.

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  8. I think Apple should concentrate on aquiring good PC software thats absent on Mac, and re-writing it for OSX. Make some sort of agreement with the original developer or buy the rights to the code, then port it in-house.

    Most PC users complain about Macs because they mistakenly think that there is a huge shortage of quality apps for Mac, compared to the PC. What they are correct about is the lack of games. I know people like Aspyr do a great job at porting, but I wish they would crank it up a little…

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  9. Boot Camp is totally misunderstood. Boot Camp is an app that creates a driver disk for Windows. It doesn’t appear to modify the Mac firmware or anything else fancy to enable Windows to be installed. It may have in it’s first incarnation, but I suspect all Intel MMacre now Windows ready off the shelf.

    Now, the other thing about Boot Camp is it supports all Apple hardware. Parallels doesn’t. For instance, at this stage Parallels only identifies CD/DVD drives as CD-ROM only. Now that’s lame.

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  10. Although. it’ll be interesting to know if Parallels recognizes all hardwarwe when using a Boot Camp created Windows.

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