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Summary:

Computerworld recently posted an advance excerpt from the newsletter of Windows expert Scot Finnie, detailing how he was making a MacBook Pro his main work and personal computer for 1-3 months. He’s testing how well it works with his necessary applications (Lotus Notes and Eudora) and […]

Computerworld recently posted an advance excerpt from the newsletter of Windows expert Scot Finnie, detailing how he was making a MacBook Pro his main work and personal computer for 1-3 months.

He’s testing how well it works with his necessary applications (Lotus Notes and Eudora) and is clearly giving it a chance, considering the laptop was spontaneously restarting due to a faulty 1GB RAM chip. And at the end, he lets his readers know:

I expect to wrap up with a final assessment of whether the Mac is a viable alternative for real people with real jobs.

Gee, thanks, Scot, for letting all of us current Mac users know that we apparently aren’t real people and we don’t have real jobs. We eagerly await your validation.

A Windows expert opts for a Mac life

  1. what are you talking about? are you having prejudice on mac? you’re totally wrong. I work with my mac all day long. who do you think you are? you have no idea what you said. of course, particular jobs need only windows base. but it’s not broad. according to the poll, mac users earn much money than PC users. average $75,000. so they don’t work for real jobs? how do they make that money? explain. get a life.

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  2. Oh quit your bitchin’. Windows machines are far better suited for business needs. Not because Windows is a superior OS, but because it has 15 years worth of third party business applications written for it. I’m talking about stuff like collaborative suites, CRM software like SAP, PeopleSoft and JD Edwards, etc. The kind of software that real deal publicly traded multi-million (billion) dollar companies use for large scale logistical operations. The funny thing is, Apple is fully aware of this and has no problem coming out and saying it themselves, just look at their current ad campaign.

    Apple is aware of their identity and doesn’t try to be something they aren’t. Macs fit well in the creative niche, like music, movies, image manipulation and all that stuff, both on the consumer level and professional level. They also work great for web design and students.

    This is coming from someone who uses Windows at work and a Mac at home. I love my mac but could never use it to do my day job.

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  3. Coming from a guy who still uses the .htm extension? Give me a break..

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  4. dogdayediting Sunday, December 3, 2006

    I’m glad to not have a “real” job. My “fake” job gives me a great deal of satisfaction, it’s a lot of fun, and make a great “real” income.

    Our business doesn’t need a staff IT person, we don’t spend a bunch of money or time fixing or troubleshooting problems. Everything works as it’s supposed to, and when something breaks, it can be fixed without having to go to Nick Burns, Computer Guy.

    Windows people can keep their “real” jobs. Actually, I wish they would stay out of the entertainment/content creation world – their products are dumbing down the industry.

    It’s been nice being the best-kept secret for creative production. Now that the Mac is making strides into the “real” business world, we are forced to listen to tools like this Mr. Finnie with his tone of how cute a Mac is.

    oh well.

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  5. I think dogdayediting said it right, nothing beats a “fake” job.

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  6. The ‘Macs are good in the creative niche’ does need dispelling, as they’re pretty good in the scientific and web app development spaces too – with one caveat – IE6 being the main web app client you need to test for.

    Personally, seeing as I spend most of my Windows life connected to Unix servers, I’d be happy to switch my day machine to a Mac. On the other hand, our MCSE techies would probably be happy to see the back of the Unix servers and get us onto Windows throughout. A lot of our customers have gone that way on similar reasons – it’s easier to get MCSE staff and they recommend MS systems.

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  7. Evangelist Mackie Sunday, December 3, 2006

    It’s too bad it seems Scott has become so dependent on Notes as well as Eudora. I know how hard it is to make the switch from apps that become part of your workflow, but Notes and Eudora aren’t pretty, or up-to-date, on any OS, and I suspect will only show their age more and more as time goes on. Or, am I talking about Windows?
    In any case there are more modern and productive apps I’d suggest.
    But it seems he’s found a provocative subject, and I’m eager to hear about the areas that Mac applications can improve on.

    Read: Great opportunity for aspiring developers…

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  8. It’s sad people still fight about this. Macs and PCs have their pros and cons. Find out which system works for you and be happy that it does. I personally run a Mac and I work for a interactive design firm that is quite real.

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  9. some things never change do they? it’s like being in the playground all over again. Optimus Prime or Megatron? Spiderman or Batman?
    who gives at rat’s arse who or what’s superior. it’s just a shame that this Finnie fellow seems to have an outlet for his rather ill thought out opinions. it’s also a shame that this could be considered valid “journalism”, unless it was designed purelt o push peoples buttons – in which case mission accomplished.

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  10. some things never change do they? it’s like being in the playground all over again. Optimus Prime or Megatron? Spiderman or Batman?
    who gives at rat’s arse who or what’s superior. it’s just a shame that this Finnie fellow seems to have an outlet for his rather ill thought out opinions. it’s also a shame that this could be considered valid “journalism”, unless it was designed purely to push peoples buttons – in which case mission accomplished.

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