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Summary:

MobileTechReview turns the pages, er page, of the Sony Reader in their latest review and gave the device a solid four out of five stars. While reading the review, I was drawn to many of the features and functions of the device: Relatively small size at […]

Sony_reader_openMobileTechReview turns the pages, er page, of the Sony Reader in their latest review and gave the device a solid four out of five stars. While reading the review, I was drawn to many of the features and functions of the device:

  • Relatively small size at 4.9 x 6.9 x 0.5 inches
  • Only 9-ounces in weight
  • Enough juice for 7,500 page "flips" on a single charge
  • 5-way directional pad for navigation

Unfortunately, I can’t see a need to spend $349 for the device for two reasons: first, it’s pricey for the functionality and second, the same functionality is available in my UMPC. Even if fairly compare the technology and say the Sony’s battery will last much longer (a very true statement), it’s much cheaper for me to carry a spare battery with my Samsung Q1 UMPC. I also prefer to switch navigation between a D-pad and a touchscreen, depending on my mood an environment; something you can’t yet do with the Sony.

While I applaud Sony’s effort here, I see limited success at best. I want to see standalone eBook readers for the masses, I really do. Let’s face it: not everyone wants to spend $500 to $1,500 on a laptop or Tablet PC to read eBooks because they don’t need all of the computing functionality that comes with it. I do need that functionality so I’d rather read my content on devices that can do more. Here’s hoping the next generation of Sony Reader comes in at or under $200. I can live without computing features, but not for $350. How about you?

Additional Sony Reader reviews we’ve read recently:

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  7. You’re a geek. My wife isn’t. I can imagine buying her a $350 ebook reader if that means she doesn’t have to schlepp six or seven paperback books on every vacation trip. I cannot image that I would buy her a UMPC or that she even would want to put up with a Windows device and its limitations (boot up time, poor resolution, poor battery life) if all she wants to do is read a book (if she wants to check her email on vacation, well, there’s always the laptop of her geek husband).

  8. As the guy in the movie said: at the end of the day you’ll know where that extra money went.

    There is simply no comparison between a UMPC screen and that of the Sony Reader.

    The reduction in eye strain alone is worth it to me.

    The major knock on the device is Sony’s bundled software. I have to help my wife purchase and then transfer ebooks each and every time…

  9. Thanks for the link. Mine aren’t reviews per se, though.

    From what I’ve seen, it’s selling very well. I hope Sony will be very aggressive in dropping the price!

  10. Kevin C. Tofel Friday, December 1, 2006

    Good point Oliver, but I still think the price is a bit much; maybe it’s just me.
    Scotty, the Sony Reader does have 800 x 600 resolution with a very high DPI, but there’s no backlight. I’d call that MAJOR eye-strain at night. ;)

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