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Summary:

SIPphone, makers of Gizmo Project have developed a new web based, and very simple version of their VoIP offering. The new web-based service utilizes a browser plugin and is expected to launch sometime soon. It will allow people to make calls by visiting Gizmo’s website, logging […]

SIPphone, makers of Gizmo Project have developed a new web based, and very simple version of their VoIP offering. The new web-based service utilizes a browser plugin and is expected to launch sometime soon. It will allow people to make calls by visiting Gizmo’s website, logging in, and simply typing in the number they wish to call without needing the Gizmo software. It would be an easy way to make calls when using computers, at say an Internet cafe. Other features like presence indicator, and instant messaging are likely to be supported, though we don’t have first hand information on how these will work.

  1. Web call is a nice feature, however, IMHO, Gizmo should work hard on improving the software quality instead of exploring all fancy features. The software crash on me often and crash on many other people, that’s why their site traffic isn’t sticking to the sky-high point when they announce the “free calls”. Other apps like Yahoo and Vbuzzer are doing much better job of releasing stable software.

    Gizmo has good potential and it just needs to be more focused.

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  2. Very interesting. Isn’t this more complicated than having your own personal softphone though?

    No going to website.
    No typing numbers.
    No hassle.

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  3. How is this different to jajah.com? Go to their website, enter a phone number and talk for free from you home phone (dont even need a mic).

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  4. Gizmo is cool, just alot of competition out there to deal with.

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  5. I’ve been following Gizmo closely since the beginning of the year (my company, Radio Handi, has been peering with them since January).

    They have done a good job of upgrading the product, most recently, by developing an outstanding mobile VoIP solution (Nokia Series 80 Internet addition).

    The web and flash based tools they are developing will make the service as easy to use as any web based service (although I think this is less important than the mobile work they have been doing).

    From a business standpoint, what I like is that Gizmo is evolving into a toolset that can be used as a stand-alone product, or can be integrated into other services (for example, see my piece at http://www.oreillynet.com/etel about how to use Voxbone to set up inbound phone numbers in some 50 countries). The openness of the system enables people to combine it with others to create a wide rnage of interesting solutions.

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  6. A web-based Gizmo that requires no download is just what they need to get more people to use it. I’ve found Gizmo’s service and pricing to be superior to Skype in most respects, but most people still haven’t heard of them. If they get it to work well, this could be very good for Gizmo.

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  7. This is good news for those who do use Gizmo but might be roaming away from your laptop (assuming it’s been surgically removed).
    To touch on Brian’s point, a lot of people haven’t heard of them as it is very US centric, a web app could really increase the visibility of the project.
    It would be good to see if it can work on small screen devices. If so it could be really important for dual mode phones that can’t currently run Skype.

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  8. Gizmo gets Flashed, makes calls from the browser…

    Although I’ve been a heavy Skype user for over two years, I still keep an eye on Gizmo. Apparently, so does Om Malik because he’s reporting that Gizmo just went sans client. Once the service launches, you’ll be able to get a small browser plug-in fr…

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