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Summary:

Being a web worker, or a self employed individual, the time to do any accounting might not always be in the mix. Concentrating on work, and sales are number one. Investigating and trying out the available software on the market can be extremely timely and shifts […]

Being a web worker, or a self employed individual, the time to do any accounting might not always be in the mix. Concentrating on work, and sales are number one. Investigating and trying out the available software on the market can be extremely timely and shifts your focus away from the core of your business.

Accounting does have to get done, and there are software packages out there that make it easier and fit nicely into your daily routines. The top accounting software package out there seems to be QuickBooks. This powerful application may have very easy to use billing, invoicing, payment and reports. It does seem a bit of an overkill, so we decided to ask you what are your feelings about Quickbooks? Are there other packages out there that you would recommend to fellow web workers?

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  1. We evaluated MYOB and Quickbooks but decided on using “Netaccounts” – an online webservice: http://www.netaccounts.com.au/

    After 9 months of use we have never regretted the choice once – it allows me to do invoicing from anywhere I can get net access – without the need to have access to my own machine.

    Scheduled invoicing is also fantastic – all my client hosting fees are compeletely automated.

  2. Does one really need anything except excel on pda?

  3. I am a freelance interpreter and translator and have been using QuickBooks for quite some time now. I’m absolutely happy with it. As far as I know, MS Office Accounting – which is available for free – interacts with QB as well. Some German web workers use Studiometry, which is available for PC and Mac.
    By the way – does anyone know how to bring QB data to a PDA?

  4. I’ve used Quickbooks for many years, but recently switched to iBiz and iBank on my macs. There were many functions in Quickbooks that I didn’t use. iBiz is trimmed down to just the necessary features and allows me to use it’s built in timeclock to bill retainer projects. At this point there are a few features I would like to see but the developer seems to be receptive to feature requests and I’ve already seen some listed in the current version 3 beta.

  5. We are working on automating tasks and billing for small businesses, this approach may suit some, see:
    http://www.folknology.com/Lab_notes_goes_live.html

    Expect more of these in the near future
    regards
    Al

  6. I find Quicken a nice program and easier to use than QuickBooks.

  7. Try Microsoft Office Accounting 2007 – very nice, and free as well. Take a look at the demo if you need some convincing…

    http://www.ideawins.com/

    Joe

  8. I suppose the solution would vary depending on the workload, the amount of invoicing, and other factors. Personally, I’m a freelance translator and interpreter (like ALEX above), so I do little more than regular invoicing, and trying not to get all my accounts into the red.

    Personally, I’ve used GnuCash on Linux and Mac (though it’s not a native Mac app, and is a bit of a hurdle to use).

    For Mac, IGG softrare’s (http://iggsoftware.com) iBank and iWork do a great job of time-tracking, invoicing, and account management.

    None of the above, though, are capable of online banking operations, etc., so, once again, it all depends on the kind of demands one has regarding the subject. But they’re fine for my personal needs.

    Now, if I had to start a company, I’d probably go for the kind of solution Adrian suggests: Netaccounts, or some other online service.

    Or, guess what? I could simply ooutsource accounting. Period. It’s a webworker, distributed, outsourced world out there, isn’t it?

  9. iBank and iWork for me also.

    Let’s be honest: iBank is just a fresher remix of Quicken, which is a scaled-down QuickBooks. This software category is a bit stale, IMO.

    I think it would be interesting to see a “Web 2.0″ (god I hate that term) version of record keeping that utilized tags instead of categories. One could the use a cloud tag to visually represent how much money was being spent in any given area.

  10. Quickbooks Online Version maybe what you need. It does not have all the features of the full version, but it is web based so you can access it from anywhere.

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