3 Comments

Summary:

Etiquette is the secret social code that hovers over our social behavior. Etiquette usually both prescribes and restricts the way that people interact with each other. It’s a way for people to show their respect, and refrain from any “bad” behaviors like insults. Etiquette reaches over […]

Etiquette is the secret social code that hovers over our social behavior. Etiquette usually both prescribes and restricts the way that people interact with each other. It’s a way for people to show their respect, and refrain from any “bad” behaviors like insults. Etiquette reaches over everything we do in our lives from eating, to listening to loud music. Different cultures also have their own set of standards from etiquette that can range from the way one greets another, showing emotions in public, and taking the last piece of food, among many others.

WebWorkerDaily reader nndl20 poses this question:
What are the trends in today’s workplace etiquette?

What about Etiquette in the workplace? and for the web based worker that works from home? Is it any different than the standard set of etiquette rules? Are there other rules that apply to just business? What are your views on this?

  1. A couple of Web Worker etiquette things that I’ve noticed over the last few weeks

    1) Don’t ask me to “Sign and Return” your stupid NDA/Contract/whatever. I won’t do it and it only pisses me off. Instead say “I’ll take your reply to this email as agreement to the contract attached”, and I’ll send you back something that says “I agree”.
    2) Don’t call me, I’ll call you. One of the biggest benefits of not having to go in to the office is larger blocks of uninterrupted time. Don’t screw that up by calling me every 10 minutes. If it’s something urgent, IM or SMS me. If it’s not urgent (1-2hr response), Email me. If it’s *really* not urgent, just tell me on my in-the-office day
    3) And surely this isn’t just a web work thing, but here goes anyway: I never want to read another “funny” email in my life. No, I know this one’s really good, I still don’t

    Share
  2. Here’s my take.
    - Think for two minutes before you click “Send” on that email. Read it again. Twice. Make absolutely sure there’s nothing there that might be misconstrued.
    - When you are in the office, sure, listen to your MP3 player. But not plugged in to speakers. Use headphones/earphones. I quite like music in the office, but you can guarantee there’s someone around who doesn’t.
    - If you do listen to music keep one ear open. It’s more rude to ignore people than blast them with your tunes.
    - The telephone/VoIP is not evil. Nor is knocking on someone’s office door/cube wall. Unlike us web workers for whom IM/email is a natural and comfortable medium, there are some people who prefer to see you face to face. In all likelihood, the person signing your paycheck is one of them.
    - If part of your web working involves dealing with non-web types, learn to think like them. You don’t actually have to think like them, just understand how they think. That way, when you deal with them, they won’t perceive you as a weirdo/stuck up/elitist/know-it-all.

    Share
  3. - get off you lazy *** and be on time for that meeting you agreed to attent
    - when I call you to ask if you’ll attent the meeting that started 15 minutes ago, don’t give me that “oh, what meeting?” crap.

    But also, don’t invite me to meetings I’m not really needed at, especially for the whole 2hrs. [Or I'll be the person above. oops]

    LG’s first is one I’m going to inforce btw!

    Mostly I find that people are so easy to drop their project in your lap, without properly doing their cut of the work. And when you point that out, you’re not flexible.
    And not taking in account that you need time to do certain jobs, yes I know I have a fancy computer, but it’s not a magic box. They’ve taking their sweet time, why not give me that same respect. That’s what I miss in todays work etiquette: respect, regard and responsiblity

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post