17 Comments

Summary:

So I’ve been doing web development for almost a decade now, but I’ve never even come close to even thinking about developing for an operating system. I’m very interested in jumping in and getting my hands dirty with developing for OS X but honestly don’t have […]

So I’ve been doing web development for almost a decade now, but I’ve never even come close to even thinking about developing for an operating system. I’m very interested in jumping in and getting my hands dirty with developing for OS X but honestly don’t have the slightest clue where to start.

What are some good resources for learning this sort of thing?

*Full disclosure: I’ll most likely take the “best-of” from your comments and wrap them up in a new post.

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By Josh Pigford

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  1. I second you there Josh, I’ve done a bit of Visual Basic in the dark days of my Microsoft life, but I would really like to do something on the Mac.

    This is one of the entries you really are glad for the “Feed for this Entry Trackback” link!

  2. http://www.cocoadev.com
    http://www.cocoadevcentral.com
    http://www.idevapps.com

    that’s three that came to mind just by thinking. if you want more, tell me ;)

  3. Michael Marmarou Monday, November 6, 2006

    First, you’ll want to decide if you want to learn Cocoa/Obj-C or use another language (i.e. Python or Ruby). This really depends on what you plan on making, and how serious you are going to be about it. Learning Objective-C (or C) can be very challenging. If going with Obj-C, I recommend going here:
    http://developer.apple.com/documentation/Cocoa/index.html

    And read both the “Getting Started” and “Fundementals.” You’ll also want to find a tutorial on Objective-C, and may even consider learning a little C first (but not necessary).

    You’ll also learn that Cocoadev.com is your new best friend. Read this
    http://cocoadev.com/index.pl?HowToProgramInOSX

    Then, you’ll want to just start reading and playing around with all the sample code Apple provides. The greatest challenge will be understanding Objective-C, and OO-Style programming.

    There are a number of books that are very good, and I highly recommend Cocoa programming for Mac OS X by Hillegass (http://cocoadev.com/index.pl?BookCocoaProgMacOSX). I would recommend Obj-C highly over others, if only because there is such a vast set of documentation and resources available. You won’t find that Python or Ruby actually help you learn any faster, and the programs won’t be much, if at all, simpler.

    Michael

  4. Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X by Aaron Hillegass. Very good one.

  5. My vote is for Aaron Hillegass’ book, too. Really good.

  6. Without a doubt, “Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X” by Hillegass is a great start. I would second the CocoaDev and CocoaDevCentral recommendations as well as adding http://www.cocoabuilder.com as an essential source of detailed info from the trenches.

    Also, be sure to add each blog listed on CocoaDevCentral to your RSS feeds.

  7. A month back I was in the same situation. The following I found useful:

    Beginning Mac Development (from MacZealots)
    Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X: I’ve looked at several Cocoa books and this is by far the best. Let me qualify that though. If you know how to program and are moving to Cocoa, this is the right book for you. However, it won’t teach you C or Objective C from scratch.
    CocoaDev Wiki: When I first started out, this was the main site I referred to when I had some questions.

    I’ve got a few more links in my article: Diving into Mac Development

  8. Python is a great place to start. They have some great tutorials for newbie and experienced programmers. http://www.python.org

    I’ve got my 11yo learning Python, but that doesn’t mean it’s simplistic. If you want to know what you can do with Python, check out a little game called Civilization IV…

    Once you learn programming, you’ll find it easier to then expand to learn the full kit of what you can do with an OS and other more challenging languages.

  9. Aaron Hillegass’ book just arrived a few days ago from amazon. I have not had a chance to dive into it but it looks pretty good. A mac developer recommended it to me.

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