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Summary:

Google has bought JotSpot, the wiki company in constant transition, for an undisclosed amount of money. We had heard about this deal a few days ago, but Google PR didn’t call back, JotSpot PR agency got snippy with us when we asked; Joe Kraus, JotSpot CEO […]

Google has bought JotSpot, the wiki company in constant transition, for an undisclosed amount of money. We had heard about this deal a few days ago, but Google PR didn’t call back, JotSpot PR agency got snippy with us when we asked; Joe Kraus, JotSpot CEO didn’t bother to return emails. Since we could not get three sources to confirm, we let it go. What is this deal all about? Let me ponder on that – over some strong coffee, from Blue Bottle of course. You can leave your comments, or simply take the poll.

  1. Hey Om, think the CEO and PR folks might have just been a bit too — oh I don’t know — busy with other stuff to get back to your precious emails? Haha, effin’ bloggers.

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  2. PR’s job is to deal with the media. and of course if you don’t ask them, then the ceo’s get all pissy and blame the reporters.

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  3. Just go live with it next time, label it as a rumor, and put them on the spot.

    Your biggest competitive advantage is the ability and reputation for breaking news/ideas before the others. If I can read it on 50 other blogs, don’t even post it.

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  4. I don’t get why you are asking the question. It certainly makes more sense than buying YouTube.

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  5. Makes sense to me:

    1. jotspot has “enterprise” software (i.e. self-hosted) that would fit nicely into google appliance, creating wiki+internal search inside LANs

    2. prevents microsoft or yahoo from getting their hands on this good product team, and forces them to go further down the food chain to get next-best-in-class.

    3. creates a little bit of healthy internal competition and/or synergy with writely team

    So, what about dabbleDB? next?

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  6. blue bottle is the best

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  7. It makes sense, Om. Google is always in need of more user-generated content, widely viewed, to sell ads next to.

    Jot started out as a wiki-centric app dev platform (not a great one, btw — compsci too complex design), but has of late been swinging more towards being a vendor of office-lite and consumer web apps. The latter — Jot plans to launch 30+ new apps in 2007 — is likely the main reason for the deal. Plus the fact that Joe and goog mgmt are all Stanford alums, and Joe started in search.

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  8. Just in from Jotspot – looks like a “free for all”!

    Will paying customers still be charged?

    We will no longer be billing customers for the use of the service. Although you will still have use of the product at your current pricing plan, we won’t charge you anymore when your current billing cycle expires.

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  9. @Om: as someone previously mentioned, you could have published earlier with a big red “rumour”-label, why not… but anyway.

    as for the deal I’m not so sure it makes a whole lot of sense to me… some key-compentents of JotSpot (word-processor, spreadsheets) are easily outperformed by Google’s counterparts, so I bet they won’t survive very long. many of Jotspot’s business-features are pretty low-key (I’m talking about project-management, recruiting manager, knowledge base…), I bet they could’ve been cloned by Google’s Dev within days. so what remains is the core-wiki functionalitiy of Jotspot, and I wonder if that alone is worth the hassle of integrating foreign codebase…

    as for the userbase… I guess it’s rather small (TechCrunch reports 2000 paying customes, and as far as I remember the free product is that much restricted, that I doubt there are many active users).

    maybe I’m missing something, but I don’t really see much sense in this…

    but I’m probably

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  10. Yeah, Blue Bottle is the best coffee in San Francisco.

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