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Summary:

A few weeks ago we mentioned that Apple’s dot mac email service was getting a bit of a Web 2.0 makeover, one that was long overdue. Well, the new email is live now, and it is a perfect embodiment of how Apple would incorporate the Web […]

A few weeks ago we mentioned that Apple’s dot mac email service was getting a bit of a Web 2.0 makeover, one that was long overdue. Well, the new email is live now, and it is a perfect embodiment of how Apple would incorporate the Web 2.0 technologies such as Ajax. The webmail client mimics your desktop client and is a wonderful experience, especially compared to what was on tap till earlier today. In fact, if it was not for that hideous apple toolbar, you would not know that you were using a web client. (That is until the system overloads.)

We tried it on Camino, Firefox 2.0 and Safari, and found the experience reasonably fast. The service lets you drag and drop messages between folders, and also allows you to look up your contacts stored in the Address Book. It is a good first step in the dot Mac makeover, which has gotten a bit long in the tooth. Is the web mail worth $100 a year? Not convinced about that, just yet.

  1. if they were to include seamless synchronization for the entire local mail on a user’s machine, include integrated file storage from within the user interface (versus separated) and add in some hosted versions of iwork, ipages etc then perhaps 99 a year is considerable (would need to see about 10 to 25 gigs of storage for that)…btw, nobody has talked about how to sync it with local mail, is there a tutorial someplace>

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  2. It still lacks even basic spam filtering, and the IMAP controls are limited, making it hard to work with third party clients, like Thunderbird.

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  3. As a guy awaiting delivery of an I Mac, I have been wondering if the dot Mac that was shipped before it is essential to my computer useage or should get returned for credit rather than opened.

    My computer needs are just to be able to access the web, and to get email from my ISP digital line. Visiting with a relative with a month old Mac, I get the impression that the I Mac I am getting (with Leonard) would not require .Mac.

    I have quite often stored old emails from message boards to save useful reference material (“how to” stuff.

    I also file similar info into My Documents.

    My main reason for switching to Mac is that the Windows gets cluttered with automatic windows updates and in spite of having plenty of hard drive space left everything bogs down. And too much freeze and hesitant action.

    I ordered the I Mac with standard memory.

    After more recent checking I am dubious of the Dot Mac being of much help- more so as this unit comes with Leonard.

    Does this sound right?

    Any advice?

    Harold S

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  4. No. Actually, mostly .me is not even available. And when it is, it is SLOW, mechanical, and jerky. I am pissed. This change was all about promoting the phone. Not about providing decent email service. No, not worth $100 a year. Plus, bookmarks have disappeared anyway. As much as I’ve liked my Apple computers, I am not willing to always be on Apple’s schedule of buying product. Especially un-green products with such a short shelf life. Really, really pissed.

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